Connect with us

Health & Wellness

Why your health should always be on your agenda

It’s not possible to prevent every health problem going, but it is wise to put your health first, no matter your age.

Published

on

If you’re young and full of life, it’s easy to assume that you’re in good health. The trouble is that symptoms of some conditions develop very slowly and some are virtually impossible to spot. There’s also the risk of your health status changing very quickly and unexpectedly. Of course, it’s not possible to prevent every health problem going, but it is wise to put your health first, no matter your age.

Here are some easy ways you can make sure that your health and wellbeing are firmly on the agenda.

Get moving

Most of us start a brand new year with intentions to get fit, but if you’re one of those people who tends to throw in the towel after a couple of weeks, it’s time to review your stance on regular exercise. Some of us focus on exercise as a means of losing weight, but there are so many more benefits to enjoy from living an active lifestyle. Exercise is proven to reduce stress and anxiety, it lowers the risk of depression, and it provides a natural high due to the release of endorphins. Working out on a regular basis also enables you to increase your fitness, stamina and strength, and you can also benefit from better immunity.

The gym isn’t for everyone, but you don’t have to become a fan of wearing lycra and lifting weights to get in shape. You can go for a walk every day, you can cycle, swim, jog or play team sports, you could work out at home, or you could do classes like yoga, spinning, Pilates, acrobatics or Zumba. Find classes that are fun, and try and vary your sessions to maintain interest and motivation. Ideally, you should aim for 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week.

Get enough sleep

Do you plod through the day dreaming of getting into bed because late or sleepless nights have become the norm? It is estimated that 1 in 10 people suffer from chronic insomnia, and up to 50 percent of adults experience sleep troubles on a short-term basis. A single sleepless night probably won’t cause great harm, but a long-term lack of sleep can be incredibly damaging to your mental and physical health. As well as affecting your energy levels and your mood, sleep loss can result in lower immunity and increased susceptibility to illness, an elevated risk of anxiety and depression, high blood pressure, strokes and heart disease. If you try and survive on little or no sleep, you’ll also be more prone to accidents, which could have disastrous consequences.

If you find it difficult to sleep, the first thing to do is take a look at your daily routine. Avoid caffeine after 5pm, put yourself to bed and get up at the same time each day, and take time to relax and unwind before you try and nod off. Exercise is also proven to aid sleep. If increasing activity levels and adjusting your routine don’t help, seek help from your doctor.

Don’t be afraid of the doctor

Many of us are reticent to seek advice, even when we don’t feel well, or we suspect that something isn’t quite right. Research shows that men are particularly reluctant to arrange medical appointments. If you shy away from seeing doctors and dentists on a regular basis, there’s a risk that potential warning signs could be missed. General examinations, routine checks and quick, painless tests can lower the risk of complications and even save lives.

Check in with your dentist every 6-9 months, have your blood pressure and BMI checked frequently, and organize regular sexual health tests if you have more than one sexual partner. It’s also a good idea to book an annual eye test and to see your doctor if you notice any changes in your health, such as weight loss, changes in your bowel habits or unexplained pain or tiredness.

Keep an eye on your alcohol intake

Many of us enjoy a drink, and there’s nothing wrong with treating yourself to a bottle of beer or a Cosmopolitan on a Friday night. The worry is that it’s very easy to exceed the recommended intake of alcohol without even realizing. In the UK, for example, the recommended maximum weekly intake is 14 units. This equates to 14 small glasses of wine or single measures of spirits.

If you’re drinking every day or you’re going all out on the weekend, you may be drinking too much. To reduce your intake, try and switch up your social calendar and arrange outings and activities that don’t involve drinking, alternate alcoholic drinks with water or soft drinks and use a diary or an app to track your consumption.

Watch what you eat

There’s a huge amount of content related to diet in the media. If you feel like rolling your eyes when you see yet another photo of avocados on toast on Instagram, you might think that healthy eating isn’t for you. The truth is that eating well doesn’t have to involve exotic fruits, surviving on juices or making ornate flowers out of raw vegetables. You don’t have to spend hours preparing meals or track down tropical ingredients at independent stores miles away from home to improve your diet. Just focus on getting the basics right.

Keep an eye on how much sugar, saturated fat and salt you eat, aim for five portions of fruit and vegetables per day and try and buy lean meat, poultry and fish. Your diet should be balanced, so resist the lure of fad diets that encourage you to cut out an entire food group.

If you’re young and fit, you may not really give your health much thought. Youth can make us feel invincible, but the truth is that it’s never too early to start looking after yourself. Nobody knows what the future holds. You don’t have to overhaul your entire lifestyle, follow crazy diets or live in the gym, but making your health a priority is always a good idea. Try to be more active, eat well, get enough rest, drink in moderation and keep up to date with regular checks and routine examinations.

Health & Wellness

LGBT adolescents more likely than other kids their age to try to kill themselves

A study found that sexual minority youth were 3.5 times as likely to attempt suicide as their heterosexual peers. Meanwhile, transgender adolescents were 5.87 times more likely, gay and lesbian adolescents were 3.71 times more likely and bisexual youth were 3.69 times more likely than heterosexual peers to attempt suicide.

Published

on

Photo by Javardh from Unsplash.com

LGBT youth have higher risk for suicide attempts.

This is according to “Estimating the Risk of Attempted Suicide Among Sexual Minority Youths: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”, a study done by Ester di Giacomo, MD; Micheal Krausz, PhD; Fabrizia Colmegna, MD; Flora Aspesi, MD; and Massimo Clerici, PhD and which was published in JAMA Pediatrics.

For this study, the researchers pooled data from 35 earlier studies to show that sexual minority youth were more than three times as likely to attempt suicide as heterosexual peers. Transsexual youth were at highest risk, nearly six times as likely to attempt suicide as heterosexual peers, researchers reported.

“Adolescents facing ‘non-conventional’ sexual identity are at risk of higher self-threatening behaviors, independent of bullying and other risk factors,” Dr.di Giacomo, the study’s lead author, was quoted as saying by Reuters Health. “I think that a difficulty in self-acceptance and social stigmatization might be keys for understanding such elevation in the risk of self-threatening behaviors.”

This may be because many LGBT youth have trouble accepting who they are because of the way they are seen by others, di Giacomo added.

The study noted that “suicide is the second-leading cause of death among adolescents” and that “sexual minority individuals are at a higher risk of suicide and attempted suicide.”

Thirty-five studies reported in 22 articles that involved a total of 2 ,378,987 heterosexual and 113, 468 sexual minority adolescents (age range: 12-20 years) were included in the analysis. The study found that sexual minority youth were 3.5 times as likely to attempt suicide as their heterosexual peers. Meanwhile, transgender adolescents were 5.87 times more likely, gay and lesbian adolescents were 3.71 times more likely and bisexual youth were 3.69 times more likely than heterosexual peers to attempt suicide.

READ:  How long does sex last?

Since the findings suggest that youths with non-heterosexual identity have a significantly higher risk of life-threatening behavior compared with their heterosexual peers, the researchers stressed that “public awareness is important, and a careful evaluation of supportive strategies (e.g. support programs, counseling, and de-stigmatizing efforts)… be part of education and public health planning.”

Continue Reading

Health & Wellness

Sexual minority adults are poorer than their straight peers

Researchers found that sexual minority women were more likely to be near poor, receive public assistance and report economic hardship in the past year. In addition, sexual minority women were less likely to graduate from college and were twice as likely to be unemployed, compared to heterosexual women.

Published

on

Photo used for illustration purpose only; by Sam Manns from Unsplash.com

Sexual minorities in have fewer economic resources than their straight peers and the gap is more pronounced among women. This is according to a new study by the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law.

The report, “Sexual orientation and sex differences in socioeconomic status: a population-based investigation in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health,” appears in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health and is co-authored by Kerith J. Conron, Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director at the Williams Institute, along with Shoshana K. Goldberg, Research Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and Carolyn T. Halpern, Professor, Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Researchers analyzed data gathered from 14,051 participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health in the US, and they found that sexual minority women were more likely to be near poor, receive public assistance and report economic hardship in the past year. In addition, sexual minority women were less likely to graduate from college and were twice as likely to be unemployed, compared to heterosexual women.

Among women, sexual orientation inequities in homeownership were more pronounced for whites than racial minorities. However, rates of homeownership were the lowest for Black and Latina sexual minority women and were the highest for heterosexual white women.

“Socioeconomic status is a major contributor to health and disease throughout a person’s life,” said Conron said lead author Kerith Conron, Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director at the Williams Institute. “Understanding the extent and nature of sexual orientation differences in socioeconomic status is essential to reducing health inequities, particular as the population of sexual minorities grows and ages.”

READ:  Pakistan passes bill to protect rights of trans persons

Fewer sexual orientation differences in economic status existed for men. Sexual minority men were more likely than their straight peers to have a college education. Yet, they earned less and were more likely to report economic hardship in the past year than straight men, which could indicate that sexual minority men face wage discrimination.

In addition, socioeconomic status among men differed by race. White sexual minority men were less likely than white heterosexual men to be among the highest earners. But Black and Latino sexual minority men did better economically than their Black and Latino heterosexual peers.

“These patterns suggest that multiple forms of inequality, as well as factors that promote resilience, must be considered in analyses of the diverse LGBT community,” said Conron. “Moreover, findings emphasize the need to include LGBT measures in large surveys conducted by the US Census Bureau, including the American Community Survey and the Survey of Income and Program Participation, in order to better track, understand, and respond to observed economic inequities.”

Continue Reading

Health & Wellness

Female to male trans adolescents report highest rate of attempted suicide at 50.8%

A study found that almost 14% of adolescents reported a previous suicide attempt, with disparities by gender identity in suicide attempts. Female to male adolescents reported the highest rate of attempted suicide (50.8%), followed by adolescents who identified as not exclusively male or female (41.8%).

Published

on

Photo by Aarón Blanco Tejedor from Unsplash.com

 Nearly 14% of adolescents reported a previous suicide attempt, with female to male adolescents reporting the highest rate of attempted suicide at 50.8%.

This is according to “Transgender Adolescent Suicide Behavior“, a study done by Russell B. Toomey, Amy K. Syvertsen and Maura Shramko, and released in Pediatrics. The study eyed to examine prevalence rates of suicide behavior across six gender identity groups: female; male; transgender, male to female; transgender, female to male; transgender, not exclusively male or female; and questioning. A secondary objective was to examine variability in the associations between key sociodemographic characteristics and suicide behavior across gender identity groups.

Data from the “Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors” survey (N = 120 617 adolescents; ages 11–19 years) were used to achieve the study objectives. Data were collected over a 36-month period: June 2012 to May 2015. A dichotomized self-reported lifetime suicide attempts (never versus ever) measure was used. Prevalence statistics were compared across gender identity groups, as were the associations between sociodemographic characteristics (i.e. age, parents’ highest level of education, urbanicity, sexual orientation, and race and/or ethnicity) and suicide behavior.

The study found that almost 14% of adolescents reported a previous suicide attempt, with disparities by gender identity in suicide attempts. Female to male adolescents reported the highest rate of attempted suicide (50.8%), followed by adolescents who identified as not exclusively male or female (41.8%), male to female adolescents (29.9%), questioning adolescents (27.9%), female adolescents (17.6%), and male adolescents (9.8%).

READ:  How long does sex last?

Identifying as non-heterosexual exacerbated the risk for all adolescents except for those who did not exclusively identify as male or female (i.e. non-binary). For transgender adolescents, no other sociodemographic characteristic was associated with suicide attempts.

According to the researchers, “Suicide prevention efforts can be enhanced by attending to variability within transgender populations, particularly the heightened risk for female to male and non-binary transgender adolescents.”

Continue Reading

Health & Wellness

Trans-inclusive policies on college campuses improve the well-being of trans students

New report provides recommendations to institutions of higher education regarding the creation of trans-inclusive communities.

Published

on

Image detal by Nathan Dumlao from Unsplash.com

report by the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law finds that transgender-inclusive policies and support systems on college campuses provide transgender students a greater sense of belonging and more positive perceptions of the campus environment.

The report reviews previous research on the experiences of transgender students and presents new findings from interviews, surveys and focus groups conducted with transgender students.

“The majority of transgender students arrive at college having endured harassment and bullying in secondary school, which research shows have a negative impact on their academic performance and mental health. This cycle may be compounded by further adverse treatment and institutional invisibility at college,” said author Abbie E. Goldberg, former visiting scholar at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law. “However, through relatively small changes, faculty and administrators can make a world of difference in the lives of transgender young adults.”

The current research focused on the institutional structures and interpersonal interactions at colleges and universities that either enforce biases or serve as sources of support for transgender students. The report concludes with ten recommendations to institutions of higher education on how to create more transgender-inclusive campus communities.

Key recommendations include:

  • Colleges and universities should explicitly include gender identity and expression in their nondiscrimination policies.
  • College curricula should address gender identity and specifically transgender identities and experiences.
  • Students should be provided with education/training to enhance their understanding and acceptance of gender diversity.
  • Faculty/staff should be exposed to mandatory training on gender identity issues.
  • Students should be able to list their preferred name on campus records and alternatives to male/female should be provided.
  • All university literature and publications should use gender-inclusive language.
  • Gender-inclusive or single-stall restrooms should be readily available on campus.
  • Universities should provide trans-inclusive/trans-accommodating housing options.
  • Counseling and health services staff should receive training on trans-inclusive and trans-affirming practices and health insurance coverage should be inclusive of trans students.
  • Trans-specific spaces and/or groups should be created with sufficient resources to support programming and events.
READ:  Gay partying off the beaten pink track of Taipei

“A growing body of research indicates that gender, including gender identity, expression and gender norms, plays a key role in academic, health and economic outcomes,” said Kerith J. Conron, the Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director at the Williams Institute. “Colleges should engage students and faculty in conversations about gender and examine policies, including those related to information systems, through a comprehensive gender lens. This would have the potential to improve campus safety and promote academic success for all students.”

READ THE REPORT HERE.

Continue Reading

Health & Wellness

Report identifies unique challenges for LGBT community facing Alzheimer’s and other dementias

Despite recent advances in LGBT rights, LGBT older people are often marginalized and face discrimination. They are twice as likely to age without a spouse or partner, twice as likely to live alone and three to four times less likely to have children.

Published

on

Photo used for illustration purpose only; by Lukas Budimaier from Unsplash.com

LGBT and Dementia – a new issues brief developed by the Alzheimer’s Association and SAGE – outlines the unique issues that arise when Alzheimer’s disease, sexual orientation, and gender identification and expression intersect, allowing advocates and care providers to better meet the needs of LGBT elders and their caregivers facing dementia.

“Living with Alzheimer’s or another dementia is not easy for anyone,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., director of quality care and psychosocial research, Alzheimer’s Association. “But LGBT individuals can often face additional challenges that need to be considered and addressed to ensure this population gets respectful and competent care.”

It is estimated that there are 2.7 million LGBT people over age 50 living in the US alone, and that number is increasing rapidly as baby boomers age and more people self-identify as LGBT. New research presented at the 2018 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference found that about one in 13 lesbian, gay or bisexual (LGB) seniors in the US are living with dementia. Dementia rates for the LGB population are 7.4 percent, compared to about 10 percent for the general population.

“While the LGBT community faces similar health concerns as the general public, LGBT people who receive a dementia diagnosis and LGBT caregivers face uniquely challenging circumstances,” said SAGE CEO Michael Adams. “This brief shines a light on these challenges, so we can begin taking steps to address them and improve the care and support LGBT people receive.”

Despite recent advances in LGBT rights, LGBT older people are often marginalized and face discrimination. They are twice as likely to age without a spouse or partner, twice as likely to live alone and three to four times less likely to have children – greatly limiting their opportunities for support. There’s also a lack of transparency as 40 percent of LGBT older people in their 60s and 70s say their healthcare providers don’t know their sexual orientation.

READ:  Over a bottle of rosé...

The brief identifies seven areas which can create unique or additional challenges for LGBT individuals living with dementia and their caregivers. They include:

  • Stigma
  • Social isolation
  • Poverty
  • Health disparities
  • Sexuality and sexual expression
  • Barriers to utilizing existing services
  • Living with HIV/AIDS

According to the brief, LGBT individuals may not reach out for services and support because they fear poor treatment due to their LGBT identity, because they fear the stigma of being diagnosed with dementia, or both. Several studies document that LGBT elders access essential services, including visiting nurses, food stamps, senior centers, and meal plans, much less frequently than the general aging population.

The Institute of Medicine identified the following pressing health issues for LGBT people: lower rates of accessing care (up to 30 percent); increased rates of depression; higher rates of obesity in the lesbian population; higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use; higher risk factors of cardiovascular disease for lesbians; and higher incidents of HIV/AIDS for gay and bisexual men. Risk factors for heart disease — including diabetes, tobacco use, high blood pressure and high cholesterol — are also risk factors for Alzheimer’s and stroke-related dementia.

Among the recommendations for organizations and service providers, the Alzheimer’s Association and SAGE suggest:

  • Expand your definition of family.
  • Educate yourself and your staff on LGBT cultural competency.
  • Find or create support groups specifically for LGBT people.
  • Partner with local LGBT community groups and political organizations.
  • Help LGBT people and their families with legal and financial planning.
READ:  How long does sex last?

Continue Reading

Health & Wellness

6 Ways you’re wrecking your mental health

In recent years, the stigma surrounding mental health has started to lift, allowing us to finally have open conversations about our well-being. However mentally healthy you may be or think you are, it’s crucial that you do what you can to take care of yourself.

Published

on

Photo by Nathan Dumlao from Unsplash.com

Like physical health, we all have a state of mental health, with some people being deemed relatively healthy and others requiring professional help. In recent years, the stigma surrounding mental health has started to lift, allowing us to finally have open conversations about our well-being. However mentally healthy you may be or think you are, it’s crucial that you do what you can to take care of yourself.

Keeping that in mind, here are six mental health mistakes to avoid.

1. Lack Of Physical Activity

Everyone knows that exercise helps us to stay physically fit, but what many people don’t realize is that it can prevent stress and anxiety too. In fact, experts believe that a simple thirty-minute walk can have an effect, with more physical activities having a bigger and better outcome. Because of this, it’s vital that you make time to exercise for at least thirty minutes every single day.

2. Not Getting Enough Sleep

While it’s important to stay active, this doesn’t mean sacrificing sleep in the process. When you have a rough nights sleep, it can leave you feeling cranky, emotional, and stressed, and this will start to cause damage unless you get into a proper routine and stick to seven or eight hours a night. To help you ensure this, you should keep your room dark and cool, with no electronics.

While you should certainly distance yourself from people that make you feel bad, you shouldn’t isolate yourself from everyone you know.
PHOTO BY STOCKSNAP FROM PIXABAY.COM

3. Associating With Negative People

Regardless of the state of your mental health, associating with people that make you feel bad about yourself will always cause some damage. If the person making you feel this way is a family member or spouse, then you should consider family counseling and couples therapy retreats to deal with your issues. For those that aren’t family, you may want to distance yourself.

4. Isolating Yourself From Friends

While you should certainly distance yourself from people that make you feel bad, you shouldn’t isolate yourself from everyone you know. Even introverted people need social interaction now and then, or you’ll start to feel lonely, depressed, and may even develop social anxiety. If you start to spend lots of time alone, arrange to meet up with friends after work or give your mom a call.

5. Refusing To Get Help

No matter what people tell you, there’s nothing wrong with asking for help when you need it. In fact, that’s the very best thing you can do. With that in mind, it’s crucial that you speak to a doctor, counsellor, or therapist when you start to notice problems with your mental health. They’ll be able to offer advice on ways to boost your mental health, including possible treatment options.

6. Self-Medicating With Substances

Drinking, smoking, and taking drugs may offer a temporary release from your mental health issues, but they are far from a cure. In fact, all they’re ever going to do is make your problems worse, while adding an addiction to the mix. Instead of trying to handle things yourself, speak to a professional for support and advice on proper treatment methods.

Mental health is not something that should be taken lightly, so avoid making the mistakes listed above.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Most Popular