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LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

Work hard, play harder, sleep infrequently: Your health vs your lifestyle

If you subscribe to the “work hard, play harder” ethos, then you’ll likely feel that your choice is a positive one— and, let’s be clear, it predominantly is. However, there’s one issue that has to be addressed: how much sleep are you getting?

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For a huge number of people, their life ethos can be summed up in one pithy phrase: “word hard, play harder”.

For the most part, taking this approach to life is considered to be a positive. Do the work you need to do to fund a lifestyle that’s as much fun as it can possibly be. A life filled with interesting work, time out with friends, and indulgence in your favorite hobbies sounds like a life that is being well-lived.

If you subscribe to the “work hard, play harder” ethos, then you’ll likely feel that your choice is a positive one— and, let’s be clear, it predominantly is. However, there’s one issue that has to be addressed: how much sleep are you getting?

When life is too full for sleep

If you have a schedule packed with work and social commitments, you’re likely well-accustomed to the occasional late night. After all, you’re not going to fit in all the things you want to do and get your eight-hours-per-night; there just aren’t enough hours in the week. So, like most people, you make the decision for sleep to take less of a priority.

The above decision might seem like a positive one; one that lets you live up to the ethos that you have found for yourself. However, there’s a potential pitfall: your health.

The health impact of lost sleep

We all know the immediate, short-term consequences of not getting enough sleep: bags under the eyes, many cups of coffee being required to kickstart our brains, and more yawns than you care to count. These are bad enough in and of themselves, but when sleep deprivation becomes chronic, your health is going to pay the price.

The impact of sleep deprivation on health is catastrophic, and the problems only become more concerning the longer sleep deprivation lasts. The occasional all-nighter might be recoverable from, but if you’re consistently not catching your Zs, then your body will begin to feel it. Chronic sleep deprivation has been linked to heart problems, brain problems, and, as outlined by http://dailyburn.com/, even causes even weight gain. As a result, playing harder may occasionally need to sit on the backburner.

One good night per week

No one is trying to tell you to dedicate yourself to ensuring you get a full night of sleep every night— for most people, that’s an unrealistic goal. However, do try and ensure that at least once per week, you get at least eight hours of sleep in a night. Make it easy on yourself to do so: plan to use essential oils to help you “switch off”, head to https://www.mattress-guides.net to find a mattress so sumptuous you’ll actively want to go to bed, and treat yourself to the most comfortable bed linen you can find. Then, when your allotted night arrives, go to bed a few hours earlier than you usually would.

One night isn’t enough…

… but it’s a start. One night of full sleep is still better than no nights of full sleep and, in time, you may be more willing to accommodate your need for sleep into your schedule. Life should be enjoyed, but adequate sleep is a big part of that enjoyment, and a few early nights will do you the world of good.

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Travel

San Francisco’s Castro District highlights Pride is still a long way away…

Outrage Magazine visits San Francisco’s Castro District to see that the LGBTQIA community may have achieved a lot, but so much more needs to be done before Pride is really felt by all.

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Where we’ve been. Where we are. Where we’re headed.

That, in a gist, is how I perceive San Francisco’s “LGBTQIA central”, Castro District to be. It celebrates where we are now by paying (some) attention to our shared past; but it also highlights the areas where our community needs to act (and act fast) before we can truly say that we have Pride.

Castro District is a neighborhood in Eureka Valley in San Francisco, California. It was named after José Castro (1808–1860), who opposed US rule in California in the 19th century. As one of the very first gay neighborhoods in the US, it actually became LGBTQIA-centric starting only the late 1960s, aided by the hippie and free love movements in neighboring Haight-Ashbury district.

By the 1970s, it was already an upscale gay community (first mitigated by people’s movement here before it became the prime spot that it is now).

Castro’s influences in the (global) LGBTQIA community are numerous.

Harvey Milk was from here; in 1973, he opened a camera store here, Castro Camera, and he also began his political involvement as a gay activist here. So this place sorta helped exemplify LGBTQIA political involvement, particularly at a time when we had even harder times.

Then in the 1980s, the area was hit hard by the HIV and AIDS crisis. This is a defining moment for the LGBTQIA community (with HIV “blamed” on gay people, and with the American government not lifting a hand to do something/anything about this sitch then), so this helped galvanize the (particularly) gay community.

Castro also shows cracks in the rainbow. Perhaps most apparent is the blatant commercialization of Pride. In Castro, everything LGBTQIA-related can be bought.

And then there are some of our stereotypical concepts of “beauty”, which surfaced from Castro. The one that immediately comes to mind is the “Castro clone” that exemplified butchness and masculinity; to date, this idiotic penchant for “straight-acting and straight-looking” continues…

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Truly, nowadays, Castro is a “living” reminder of the LGBTQIA community’s history.

But Castro also shows cracks in the rainbow.

Perhaps most apparent is the blatant commercialization of Pride. In Castro, everything LGBTQIA-related can be bought.

This – not surprisingly – highlights the social stratification within the LGBTQIA community. Exactly because the we’re talking moolah, and because not everyone has this, the social classes that divide the community is highlighted. Even the nearby LGBT Center isn’t immune to this, with some LGBTQIA people critical of it (supposedly) for being elitist.

Then there’s the leaving behind of members of the LGBTQIA community. For instance, in San Francisco, the homeless population is approximately 7,499 – 29% of them identify as LGBT; and 11% of them have HIV or AIDS. If you want to see some of them, try waking up early – like 6.00AM or so – and take a walk along Castro Street to see them, living in the midst of the trash from the partying that happened the night before.

Castro has long become a tourist trap that highlights “progressive LGBTQIA community” a la America. And – as such – it can’t be denied how it’s a good reminder that we’ve (well, at least ‘they’ have) made progress.

But it also stresses – for me – that so much more still needs to be done…

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In the Scene

‘Kasarisarian’ LGBTQIA community cultural event slated in Lucena City on July 21-26

To “elevate the discussion about LGBTQIA Pride”, QZN Bahaghari and Guni-Guri Collective are hosting the 2018 iteration of “Kasarisarian” a cultural event, from July 21 to 26 in Lucena City.

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To “elevate the discussion about LGBTQIA Pride”, QZN Bahaghari and Guni-Guri Collective are hosting the 2018 iteration of “Kasarisarian” a cultural event, from July 21 to 26 at the ESPASYO ART GALLERY, Quezon Avenue corner Trinidad Street, Lucena City in the Quezon Province.

Particularly for this year’s event, “we’re trying to elevate the discussion and the perspective on the current situation of the LGBTQIA people in the country,” said Aaron Bonette, co-organizer of the event. “We want to make Kasarisarian 2 a non-hierarchal exhibition invested in grassroots community organizing, and focused on radical queer narratives, visioning and politics. This means that the curated works will tackle and represent queer lives and struggles based on the current and past experiences of LGBTQIA people that are skeptic – from the looming commercialized cooptation of Pride to the glitter industrial complex to the failed political myth of equality through law, violence against LGBTQIA people and class hierarchy.”

The event will feature 15 artists based in the Quezon Province and two artists based in the Netherlands, including: Lans Lans, Elvira Bvlgari, Aaron Bonette, Syeril Powsa, Catsoup, John Van Vallesterol, Annita Remoroza, Aann Reynales, Jaymar Valdoria, Alliza Beth, Joma Importante, Skimmi Shimmi, Beatriz Rogas, France dela Paz, and Brian van Niehoff. Documentaries from Outrage Magazine’s #KaraniwangLGBT series will also be shown; as will Sunugin ang Aparador by Gio Potes, and Mark & Lenny by Gio Potes.

Outrage Magazine launches #KaraniwangLGBT

Bonette added that the annual Pride month celebration has just ended, and yet – over 20 years since the first such gathering in Metro Manila “the LGBTQIA movement does and spends more on branding rather than coalition building, with the mainstream LGBTQIA movement focusing on soliciting funds from corporation to run our cause; it’s almost like our rights have been bought, paid for and sold to the highest bidder no matter how anti-worker or neoliberal policy upholder that corporation is.”

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In this sense, “the metaphor of being ‘treated like a piece of meat’ is valid, as if our bodies and identities are there to be exploited in the free market of commodification and oppression.”

Bonette said that they are cognizant that “corporate money also do some good for the community”, but that awareness is needed so LGBTQIA people also recognize that “there is something antithetical about a movement for equality and justice funded by the forces in the world that is also most responsible for widespread economic and social inequality.”

In the end, “we’d like to use this event as a venue to ask LGBTQIA people: What’s the future ahead of us? When our community is not yet united as a social movement that addresses the issues facing the most marginalized LGBTQIA people, with those fighting against systemic poverty, are we really making any progress? Or has the LGBTQIA movement, our movement, already hijacked by power elites advocating for their own interests?”

“Kasarisarian” is a term coined from: “Kasarian” which means gender, and (2) “Sari-Sari” for variety and diversity. It aims to provide queer (and straight) artists a non-commercial and an uncompromising space to tackle and explore various queer narratives, identities and politics.

This is a free event (yes, there’s no admission fee); though it is open for donations (during the event). Door will open at 1:00PM on July 21 and the program will start at exactly 6:00PM with a welcome reception, followed by the Artist Talk, film screening and cultural performances. This will run until July 26.

For more information, head to Guni-Guri Collective; or contact Aaron Bonette at aarnmssbntt@gmail.com or 0995-085-3664.

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Health & Wellness

LGBT teens use e-cigarettes more than straight peers, survey says

Lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender teens have substantially higher rates of e-cigarette use than straight youth, with these teens far more likely to say they had vaped or smoked in the past 30 days than their straight or questioning counterparts.

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Lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender teens have substantially higher rates of e-cigarette use than straight youth – at least in Ohio, with the Ohio Department of Health reporting that teens who described themselves as LGB were far more likely to say they had vaped or smoked in the past 30 days than their straight or questioning counterparts in a Ohio Healthy Youth Environments Survey taken during the 2016-2017 school year.

IMAGE USED FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSE ONLY; PHOTO BY DANI RAMOS ON UNSPLASH

Meanwhile, those who described themselves as transgender or gender nonconforming were far more likely to vape or smoke than their male and female peers. Transgender teens used e-cigarettes at twice the rate of males or females.

Among the reasons cited for the use of e-cigarettes and even traditional cigarettes is to cope with the stress and anxiety; in the case of LGBTQIA people, when faced with social stigma. Also, similar risky behaviors may be picked as youths try to find a community where they feel accepted.

Better information about the health effects of e-cigarettes are said to be therefore needed, with emphasis on the difficulty of giving up nicotine the moment its consumption is started, similar to traditional cigarette use.

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LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

Cartoon Network series ‘Steven Universe’ airs a lesbian marriage proposal

“Steven Universe”, a series from Cartoon Network, showcased a lesbian marriage proposal between two out queer characters in a special July 4 episode. This has never been done in children’s television before.

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SCREENCAP FROM CARTOON NETWORK’S JULY 4 EPISODE OF ‘STEVEN UNIVERSE’

When cartoons rock.

“Steven Universe”, a series from Cartoon Network, showcased a lesbian marriage proposal between two out queer characters in a special July 4 episode.

This has never been done in children’s television before.

The two characters – Sapphire and Ruby – made their long-term relationship official. Ruby first went on a journey to self-discovery, only to return to ask for Sapphire’s hand in marriage, saying that “This way we can be together even when we’re apart.”

Earlier interviewed by Variety, the show’s creator, Rebecca Sugar, expressed her support for equal representation.

“I wanted to really create an image of a queer couple that makes sense together,” Sugar was quoted as saying. “Usually the couple is a man and a woman. But you don’t show that love can exist between two men or two women. I wanted to create equal-opportunity love stories for children.”

The inclusive episode, simply titled “The Question”, marked the show’s 21st episode in its fifth season.

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Travel

Ecuadorian court rules that nation’s ban on same-sex marriage is illegal

A court in Ecuador ruled that the nation’s ban on same-sex marriage is illegal. The decision was rendered following a January ruling by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights that the 20 countries under its jurisdiction must offer equal marriage rights to same-sex couples.

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IMAGE DETAIL BY DEZALB FROM PIXABAY.COM

Big hurrah for marriage equality.

A court in Ecuador ruled that the nation’s ban on same-sex marriage is illegal.

This decision was rendered by two judges in the Family, Women, Children and Adolescents Court in response to two cases brought by same-sex couples who were denied marriage licenses. The judges ruled that they must be allowed to wed immediately, as they cited a January ruling by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights that the 20 countries under its jurisdiction must offer equal marriage rights to same-sex couples.

Last year, a decision in favor of marriage equality was released by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in response to a case filed in Costa Rica. Thereafter, the member countries of the Organization of American States across Central and South America have to comply with the ruling.

Ecuador initially did not follow the ruling of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights with the country’s Civil Registry denying licenses to the two female couples, leading to the cases that came before the Ecuadorian court in the city of Cuenca. Family, Women, Children and Adolescents Court Judges Iliana Vallejo and Ruth Alvarez both ruled that rejection of the women’s marriage license applications was a violation of their human rights.

The Civil Registry is appealing the ruling to the Provincial Court in Azuay, the province in which Cuenca is located.

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LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

Nail your paper like a pro

Even if you do not aim to become an A-level student, you still do want to pass these core subjects without taking the courses for a second or third time. Here we will try to advise on how to better organize an essay as well as the whole writing process.

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Academic writing is an essential part of the university education and therefore is to be mastered by students. However, to master essay writing one has to put some effort and time. Why? Because as anything in life success has to be worked for.

Even if you do not aim to become an A-level student, you still do want to pass these core subjects without taking the courses for a second or third time. Here we will try to advise on how to better organize an essay as well as the whole writing process.

Organizing Essay Writing Process

When organizing your writing process the first thing to figure out is whether you actually do have time to write it on your own. Let us be honest, studies are not the only thing we have in life, and even if we dedicate a lot of time to it, sometimes requirements are too high. Therefore, many students recourse to a usage of academic writing or advisory services https://edubirdie.com/ to leave some time for personal or professional development.

For those desiring to perform the assignments on their own it would be beneficial to consider these tips:

  • plan in advance: we all are masters of procrastination and rarely does it end up with a positive result. So do not procrastinate, start working on your essay as early as possible. Simply reading a couple of pages on the topic will significantly help later;
  • give yourself an adequate amount of time: when planning, people tend to overestimate their abilities and underestimate the difficulty of the task to be performed. Therefore, set your own deadline a few days before an actual one;
  • go to the library: online research is cool and convenient, but at the dormitory or at home people face numerous distractions. These small and insignificant things will constantly distract you from being focused on one thing;
  • find inspiration: especially if you hate writing or are not that good at this type of work, try to fall in love with your topic. You may watch some interesting Ted Talks on subject or writing in general;
  • stop planning and start doing: sometimes we tend to plan every second of our life and it takes more time than actually do something. In writing try to plan only the most essential steps like researching, drafting, editing, and proofreading, do not micromanage.
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Structuring Your Essay

In academic writing, the structure makes all the difference. Since scholarly works are heavily used by researchers and academics, they should be readable and easy to understand. A clear structure is the main prerequisite for this. Core essay parts include an introduction with a strong and concise thesis statement, a few paragraphs with a thesis statement each, and finally conclusion comprising all the main ideas and recommendations. Reference list and appendices are also to be provided.

Introduction and thesis statement. Upon all the initial stages of researching and drafting an essay, one should start writing an introduction. Being the very first thing one is to read in your essay, try to make introduction capturing and interesting. Present the problem and how you tried to solve it. In the final part of the introduction, including the thesis statement. All the other paragraphs in your essay will revolve around this one central idea.

Main Paragraphs. The body of your essay argues, explains or describes your topic. Each main idea that you wrote in your diagram or outline will become a separate section within the body of your essay. Begin by writing one of your main ideas as the introductory sentence. Next, write each of your supporting ideas in sentence format, but leave three or four lines in between each point to come back and give detailed examples to back up your position.

Conclusion. The conclusion brings closure of the topic and sums up your overall ideas while providing a final perspective on your topic. Your conclusion should consist of three to five strong sentences. Simply review your main points and provide reinforcement of your thesis. You may also include some recommendations for future researches and outline the limitations of the conducted study.

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Finalization. When finished with an essay draft, there are still a few steps to be performed. Firstly, leave it for a few days and return to the essay to read it once again. Then edit all the issues you may have found. Never omit proofreading. If you simply cannot proofread the essay because you are tired of it, ask your friends to do it for you. Review the instructions one more time and check whether you have answered the question or properly dwelled on the subject.

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