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At the Lion’s Road

Patrick King Pascual visits The Mansion, where – he says – there is “fantasy fulfillment inside” awaiting to happen.

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They call it “The Mansion.”

It’s where you can meet different people.
A guy who could make you laugh, but has the smallest dick in the room.
A straight-acting gay guy who performs Sarah Brightman’s ‘La Luna’ flawlessly.
Someone who thinks he’s the best Lady Gaga impersonator.
A guy who likes you a lot, but after blowing you, disappears.
Someone who will invite you in the dark room and later leave you for a bigger dick.
Someone who will ask you to bend over.
A mouth that can make you come more than once or twice.
And at times, someone who can be you friend.

***

Nakarating ka na ba sa isang lugar kung saan ang mga pinapantasya mo ay maaring magkatotoo?
(Have you ever been in a place where most of your fantasies can become reality?)

***

It was December of 2007, my first visit to “The Mansion”. I was with Anton, a very good friend, my partner in crime when exploring different places and/or “trips”.

I read about the place somewhere online. They reviewed it as an “oldie but goodie with lots of surprises”. I got curious. I downloaded the location map and messaged Anton.

We started our hunt one Tuesday evening. It was very difficult to find the place, especially if you’re not familiar with the area. It took us 200 pesos, two hours, and half a pack of Marlboro Lights before we finally found where Lion’s Road is.

Standing in front of us was a big red gate, supported by old bricks and wood. The place’s aura was eerie, and everything in front of us took us back to the time when the Japanese occupied the Philippines.

Anton rang the bell. We waited.

As I lit my 12th Marlboro Lights, the big red gate opened. A middle-aged gay guy greeted us and led us in.

We were asked to sit on a bench outside the main door. Anton borrowed my lighter and lit his 13th Marlboro. The guy left and went inside to call the manager.

Anton and I were whispering to each other while laughing, and quietly discussed if we still wanted to go inside because we both felt scared.

“Good morning sir, what can I do for you?” a voice coming from the door asked.

“We heard about this place and we want to be members,” Anton answered.

He asked several questions. Where did we find out about the place? Do we know anyone who is already a member? Such stuffs. It’s not like one of those walk-in kinds of places.

After several minutes, we’re finally allowed to go inside, and we became members.

The ground floor was dark, with only two lamp shades providing light – one on the receiving area and the other on the stage area. It would take time before your eyesight adjusts.

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When you get inside, the stage is what will greet you. They use it during big nights or whenever there’s an event.  During weeknights, clients usually stay in the videoke area, which is beside the stairs that lead to the second level, and to the mini pool.

The structure of the videoke room and the stairs reminded me of the porn movie “A Body to Die For” – old and rustic. It’s like fulfilling your fantasy of having sex in an old house.

The second floor has the lockers and the first activity area.

From the thin clothes that served as dividers of the activity room and the locker area, you can hear countless moans coming from inside. Like a curious kid in Toy Kingdom, we went inside and explored it thoroughly.

I felt a hand touch my behind. I felt another grab my front. We continued walking and didn’t mind their touching.

I puffed my Marlboro Lights to give the place little illumination.

I saw three guys playing with each other on one bed.  One was on top of the other, while the other is kneeling in front of the two.

I liked what I saw.

I moved to the other direction and puffed my Marlboro again. I saw two guys in a 69 position on the other bed, while the others sat around them, watching, trying to join in the action.

After a quick ocular inspection, we went out of the activity area and went down the stairs. We walked towards the pool area. We went straight to the pool bar and ordered beer. We lit another Marlboro.

The bartender engaged us in a small conversation. He asked us if it was our first time in the place. Anton and I nodded.

He told us that on different days, they offer different promos and themes. Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, they have their towel night.  Tuesday is their topless night.  Thursday is their briefs night (your underwear and a hand towel). Saturday is their event night, though also a towel night. Meanwhile, Sunday is skin night (nothing on, just a hand towel).

After a few minutes, we left the pool bar and continued exploring the place. We walked on the side of the main house to get to the back house.

As we slowly reached the dark entrance of the back house, the silhouette of the people who were standing inside caught our attention. The number of people is double compared to the ones in the first activity area. They were standing side by side, as if waiting for someone who will engage into something with them. They were touching each others’ bulges, kissing each other, while also touching people behind them.

It felt like we were in Sodom and Gomorrah. It would be unethical to define it as Halfway to Heaven, but it felt like it. Like all the lusts in the chatroom, dark rooms of Red Banana and Club Bath (when they were still open), the double-movie cinema experiences in Quiapo and Libertad (the years when they were still operating) were all here, all jammed in this dark, spine-chilling, fantasy-like place. Anton and I called it “the dungeon”.

No matter how hard we puffed our Marlboros, the darkness of the place fought the ample light of our cigarettes.

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We entered the dungeon, with our hands touching the walls and our feet sliding on the unfamiliar floor, leading us inside the spacious dark place.

Anton held my hand. We walked towards the middle. We heard more moans, felt several more touches on our groins and our behinds.

We bumped against a group of people who were engaging in an orgy. I pulled Anton to have a closer look at what they were doing. I puffed my Marlboro and saw the outline of five guys standing in a circle, and one guy was kneeling in the middle blowing their dicks one after the other.

I felt someone touch my bulge and squeezed it like he was pulling me towards him. I got distracted. I spread my arms trying to touch and find him but I couldn’t. It was too dark. All I could grasp that was in my reach was Anton.

We went outside and went to the second floor of the dungeon, the video room. Anton led the way as I lit my last Marlboro.

The television was playing a familiar porn movie.

There were three people in the room. When we reached the end of the stairs and walked behind the bench in front the television, their attention focused on us. It was as if they were waiting for a go-signal from us.

There’s also an activity room on the second floor, the third and last. It’s on the other side, separated by the brick wall and the wooden wall that had “glory holes”. I think it was strategically placed in the video area, so that while watching Jeff Palmer perform his bareback scenes, you can put your dick in one of the holes and wait for someone to suck it, or vice-versa.

Anton and I decided to cruise separately, to cruise on our own, and meet each other after two hours in the pool bar.

He stayed in the video room. I went back to the dungeon.

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I heard the familiar moans again.  Once again, I felt the heat coming from the bodies having a release with each other.

I wanted to light a cigarette but I remembered I finished everything I brought. And just on my way out of the dungeon to go to the bar and buy another pack of Marlboros, I felt someone grab my arm. It was the familiar arm grab I felt earlier.

I don’t know if I was hallucinating, because of the lack of Marlboro smoke in my body or he was the same guy who tried to pull me earlier. My other arm grabbed his hand, and I pulled him closer to me. I wanted to kiss him. There’s something in him that drew me closer to his lips even though I haven’t seen his face yet.

He pulled me outside the dungeon for a better view of each other.

He was tall. He had a nice set of arms. His body was like that of a swimmer, with a not-so flat tummy. He was wearing a baseball cap. He smiled and whispered to my ear: “Let’s go to the locker area activity room.” I nodded and followed him.

When we got inside the activity room, there were only few people. The bed near the entrance was empty. He crawled on the bed and I followed him. I turned his cap around and started kissing him.

I unbuckled his belt, and unbuttoned his cargo shorts. I pulled down his briefs, and started playing with his already hard and throbbing cock.

He unbuttoned my jeans and pulled it with my underwear down to my knees. We played with each other while kissing. I turned around. We were in a 69 position.

Someone tried to join us, tried to reach for my dick but he grabbed the hand and pushed it away. He continued to give me head, I deep-throated him…

***

This is one of the countless stories I have in The Mansion.

***

It was December of 2003 when The Mansion opened and catered to every gay’s fantasy and entertainment. A towel bar that changed the meaning of “bathhouse” to an unconventional way. It is a fantasy-driven place.

***

The Mansion and the experiences I had inside were all euphoric. It’s addicting. There came a time that every night, after work, I’ll meet Anton somewhere in EDSA and go there.

There’s fantasy fulfillment when you’re inside The Mansion, like an ego satisfaction. When you’re having sex with someone, and people gather around you and jerk off while watching you get off, the feeling is amazing, it’s cathartic…

Living life a day at a time – and writing about it, is what Patrick King believes in. A media man, he does not only write (for print) and produce (for a credible show of a local giant network), but – on occasion – goes behind the camera for pride-worthy shots (hey, he helped make Bahaghari Center’s "I dare to care about equality" campaign happen!). He is the senior associate editor of OutrageMag, with his column, "Suspension of Disbelief", covering anything and everything. Whoever said business and pleasure couldn’t mix (that is, partying and working) has yet to meet Patrick King, that’s for sure! Patrick.King.Pascual@outragemag.com

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Relevance of public & private sectors’ support highlighted in Quezon City’s 2018 Pride parade

Highlighting the importance of the participation of all stakeholders, not just the LGBTQIA community but also including the public and the private sectors, Quezon City in Metro Manila held the last Pride parade in the Philippines for 2018.

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Highlighting the importance of the participation of all stakeholders, not just the LGBTQIA community but also including the public (including government) and the private sectors, Quezon City in Metro Manila held one of the last Pride parades in the Philippines for 2018.

Hanz Defensor, who helms Quezon City Pride Council (QCPC), the organizer of the annual gathering, told Outrage Magazine in an exclusive interview that Quezon City is “quite fortunate” that it now has an anti-discrimination ordinance (ADO) that protects LGBTQIA people from discrimination.

Signed by mayor Herbert Bautista (whose term ends in May 2019), City Ordinance 2357-2014, otherwise known as The Quezon City Gender-Fair Ordinance, eyes to “to actively work for the elimination of all forms of discrimination that violate the equal protection clause of the Bill of Rights enshrined in the Constitution, existing laws, and The Yogyakarta Principles; and to value the dignity of every person, guarantee full respect for human rights and give the highest priority to measures that protect and enhance the right of all people; regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity and expression (SOGIE).”

But Defensor said that, “admittedly, kulang pa rin (this is still lacking).” This is because – even if they already have the ADO and its implementing rules and regulations (IRR), the actual implementation continues to be challenging.

Quezon City, Defensor noted as an example, has “a lot of business establishments, and while they know that discriminating against LGBTQIA people in the city is prohibited by law, not all of them actually have a copy of the ADO and the IRR to know the small details.”

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As he encouraged particularly those affected by the ADO to “download (the same) from Quezon City’s official website”, he is also encouraging other local government units to already take steps to also protect their LGBTQIA constituents, perhaps learning from Quezon City’s example.

The same sentiment was expressed in a letter sent to QCPC by Pres. Rodrigo Duterte, who remarked that Quezon City’s ADO – which also mandates the annual holding of the Pride parade – “has become a source of inspiration for advocates of gay rights in the Philippines and the rest of the world” because “it has institutionalized the city’s progressive and inclusive policy that eliminates discrimination on the basis of SOGIE.”

Though criticized for pinkwashing, Duterte still expressed hope that Pride further strengthens “the solidarity of (the) community so you may inspire the entire nation with the diversity and dynamism of your talents and skills.”

To contextualize, past administrations did not openly support Pride-related events.

Also, even if Akbayan partylist – which is aligned with Liberal Party that helmed the country under Pres. Benigno Aquino III prior to Duterte’s term – has been sponsoring the anti-discrimination bill for almost 20 years now, it still fails to gain traction, including during Aquino’s administration when it was largely ignored.

As an FYI, Quezon City actually hosted the largely accepted first Pride March in Asia.

On June 26, 1994, ProGay Philippines and Metropolitan Community Church helmed a march in Quezon City. Dubbed as “Stonewall Manila” or as “Pride Revolution”, it was held in remembrance of the Stonewall Inn Riots and coincided with a bigger march against the imposition of the Value Added Tax (VAT).

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Defensor stressed the need to be pro-active when confronting LGBTQIA-related discrimination. While the ADO is there, he said that should LGBTQIA people from Quezon City experience discrimination, “seek help” and know that “QCPC is here, and the LGU will back you.”

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3rd Iloilo LGBTQI gathering stresses that #PRIDEisProtest

Iloilo hosted its 3rd LGBTQI Pride parade, with the core message highlighting that Pride remains an act of protest.

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PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ‘HUMANS OF ILOILO’; CHANNEL BIBANCO; ALJHUR ALQUIZAR III

The city of Iloilo hosted the third iteration of its Pride parade, with the core message highlighting that Pride remains an act of protest. In a way, this is contrary to the current direction many Pride-related parades are taking – including in Metro Manila – where advocacy is getting trumped by commercialization/partying.

Metro Manila’s LGBT gathering breaks attendance records, highlights ubiquity of LGBT people if not causes

In a statement provided to Outrage Magazine, Carlo Gabriel Evidente of the Iloilo Pride Team said that the move to focus on #PRIDEisProtest is “in recognition of the legacy of the Stonewall Riots, and the continuing gender-based violence and discrimination experienced by persons of various SOGIEs all over the world.”

Irish Granada Inoceto, vice chairperson of Iloilo Pride Team, added: “Through this (gathering we hoped to) make all colors of gender visible and celebrated. This is our way of saying we are here and we are not going anywhere.”

Over 2,000 people joined this year’s gathering, the biggest for the three-year-old annual gathering.

Iloilo has actually been making rainbow waves lately.

In June, the city of Iloilo joined the ranks of local government units (LGUs) with LGBTQI anti-discrimination ordinances (ADOs), with the Sangguniang Panlungsod (SP) unanimously approving its ADO mandating non-discrimination of members of minority sectors including the LGBTQI community.

Iloilo City passes anti-discrimination ordinance on final reading

Following this, in August, Iloilo Mayor Jose S. Espinosa III declared the city as “LGBT-friendly”, with plan to establish an office that will develop programs and activities for the LGBT community.

Iloilo declared as ‘LGBT-friendly’ city; mayor eyes to establish office to handle LGBTQI-related efforts

For Inoceto, “as long as Pride remains inclusive of the issues of the most marginalized, when it continues to be a platform for the courage of those who stand for LGBT rights and human rights, Pride will never grow passé.”

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PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ‘HUMANS OF ILOILO’; CHANNEL BIBANCO; ALJHUR ALQUIZAR III

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Malabon passes anti-discrimination ordinance on the basis of SOGIE

Malabon City now has an anti-discrimination ordinance (ADO) that prohibits: discrimination in schools and the workplace, delivery of goods or services, accommodation, restaurants, movie houses and malls. It also prohibits ridiculing a person based on gender and/or sexual orientation. Penalties for discriminatory act/s include imprisonment for one month to one year, a fine of P1,000 to P5,000, or both.

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Still slow national move; better local endeavors.

In the absence of a national law that will protect the human rights of LGBTQI Filipinos, a growing number of local government units are taking the lead in ensuring that LGBTQI-related discrimination is checked. And now the city of Malabon has joined the list of LGUs with an anti-discrimination ordinance (ADO).

City Ordinance 16-2018, signed on September 10 by Mayor Antolin Oreta III, declares “as a policy of Malabon City to actively work for the elimination of all forms of discrimination that offend the equal protection clause of the Bill of Rights.”

Among the prohibited acts in the ADO are: discrimination in schools and the workplace, delivery of goods or services, accommodation, restaurants, movie houses and malls. It also prohibits ridiculing a person based on gender and/or sexual orientation.

Penalties for discriminatory act/s include imprisonment for one month to one year, a fine of P1,000 to P5,000, or both.

As with other ADOs, the Malabon ordinance similarly mandates the creation of the Malabon City Pride Council, tasked to monitor complaints, assist victims of stigma and discrimination, as well as recommend to the city council additional anti-discrimination policies and review all existing resolutions, ordinances and codes if these have discriminatory policies.

The same Pride council will oversee the implementation of an anti-discrimination campaign and the organization of LGBTQI groups in the barangays of the city.

The Malabon ADO also aims to include anti-discrimination programs (including psychological counseling, legal assistance, and forming of barangay-level LGBTQI organizations), with the budged to be sourced from the gender and development (GAD) plans, projects and programs (uo to 5%).

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The ADO also tasks the Malabon police station to investigate cases involving violence based on SOGIE.

Also with the ADO, Malabon will now commemorate LGBTQI-related events, including the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia on May 17; Pride parade in December; World AIDS Day on December 1; and Human Rights Day on December 10.

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What it’s like to be trans in Taiwan

Tamsin Wu visits gay-friendly Taiwan, where she meets Abbygail Wu, founder of Intersex, Transgender and Transsexual People Care Association (ISTSCare), who said that the country is still failing its LGBTQ citizens, and particularly lags in promoting trans rights.

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Photo detail by Thomas Tucker from Unsplash.com

Taiwan may be the most gay-friendly country in Asia, but according to Abbygail Wu, founder of Intersex, Transgender and Transsexual People Care Association (ISTSCare), the country still receives a “failing mark” when it comes to LGBTQ equality. Transgender people, in particular, usually bear the brunt of sex-based discrimination.

ISTSCare has a one-woman 24/7 hotline service. Abby has dealt with calls concerning struggles related to suicide attempts, job insecurity or homelessness, and even domestic violence. To provide support and assistance to hotline callers, ISTSCare also partners with NGOs and other LGBTQ-related organizations.

Aside from the hotline service, the organization does its advocacy work through protests, by maintaining an online presence, as well as directly communicating with political figures and trans-friendly journalists to rouse awareness and discussion on transgender and intersex issues.

ISTSCare in Taiwan

In 2014, four years after the first official notice regarding gender reassignment procedures in Taiwan was issued, the Ministry of Interior (MOI), with the support of the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW), announced the easement of legal requirements on changing gender identity. MOI promised that it would immediately work on letting transgender citizens change their gender marker without having to go through rigorous psychiatric assessments, sex reassignment surgery (SRS) and parental approval. However, MOI backtracked since then.

“MOI, which is handling the national ID cards, they said there are still a lot of research to do about the gender issue and they try to get some professional opinions, but MOHW already said this is not a medical issue, it’s an internal affair issue. So MOI, they’re just under the pressure and paused a lot of meetings… and now the issue is still under research for four years,” Abby lamented. “We’re the first Asian country to pass the bill but it’s not implemented.”

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Despite MOHW already stating that medical professionals should not have a say when it comes to determining one’s gender identification, transgender citizens are still presently forced to consider SRS. Besides that, they are also required to seek the expensive involvement of psychiatrists and, outrageously, the consent of their parents. Otherwise, their gender identity cannot be legally recognized.

Abby clarified that not all transgender people want the help of doctors to validate their gender identity. Hence, SRS is especially discriminatory towards transgender citizens who do not wish to undergo surgery. “What is gender? Is it just based on our anatomy? Or is it in our behavior? In our mind? Or in the way we dress?… There are a lot of factors that influence what gender one identify as, but society focus on the least publicly visible aspect – our sex organ.”

Abby continued, “There are risks to surgery and that is one of the reasons why not all transgenders want to go through it. And also, they may question themselves, ‘Do I really want to have surgery or is it just for the sake of getting this ID?’”

Abby standing beside the transgender pride flag.
Photo credit: Ketty W. Chen

“One day before the presidential election, I went to the DPP (Democratic Progressive Party) headquarters to talk with the Department of Woman. I told them, ‘tomorrow is already the day for voting, are you going on stage and advocate for transgender rights? This has been neglected for the past 3-4 years. Then they just told me, ‘this requires social consensus’… I went out of that meeting deeply upset,” Abby shared.

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With lack of funding, community support and societal understanding of trans issues, how could transgender rights obtain social consensus when this feat requires acceptance and approval from the status quo in order for the relevant social change to take effect? Why should the rights and well-being of a minority group fall in the hands of the majority? Currently, both the public and the government possess inadequate knowledge in dealing with transgender issues, which exacerbates the struggles transgender citizens face.

Prejudice against transgender folks can also be felt within LGBTQ communities. On one hand, some non-transgender members of the LGBTQ community question the gender identity of trans people. On the other hand, there is also internalized transphobia.

“A lot of transgender are more binary [in the way they see gender]. They think a man should act and look a certain way and that a woman should act and look a certain way… ISTSCare does not condone this kind of thinking,” Abby said.

Trans activist Abbygail Wu and her partner in a protest for their marriage right.
Photo credit: Ketty W. Chen

When asked why ISTSCare is run by only three people (including Abby and her partner), she shared that many transgender citizens in Taiwan find it difficult to prioritize doing advocacy work because their life situation is oftentimes mentally and emotionally taxing. On top of having to deal with an unsupportive family, they often face discrimination in the job market. Hence, there’s a high level of difficulty for them to get a good job, gain professional working experience and make a decent living, let alone have the financial resources to go through SRS. As of now, they’re in this loop of societal discrimination and economic vulnerability with no recourse.

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Another reason for the lack of transgender-focused activists in Taiwan is attributed to the problem of privilege. Abby adds that well-off transgender citizens tend to be exclusive in their social group. Post-surgery and after assimilating in heteronormative society, they also tend to ignore the struggles faced by less fortunate transgender citizens. They would rather not get associated for fear of being found out and face discrimination. Albeit joining Pride Parades, they are at other times nowhere to be found when it comes to advocating for transgender rights.

Abby clarified that not all transgender people want the help of doctors to validate their gender identity.
Photo credit: Abbygail Wu

Abby said that ISTSCare’s main goal right now is to push for a non-discriminatory, comprehensive gender identity law in Taiwan.

“We hope to be like Argentina. Just file [required] papers to the courthouse and they will assign the legal gender change. No need to go through any kind of medical process.”

Having a well thought out gender identity law may not help solve all transgender issues and alleviate them from all of their struggles. However, getting the said law done and implemented right would be one significant progress for the recognition of the human rights and dignity of, not only transgender citizens, but also intersex and non-binary people.

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Chance of HIV-positive person with undetectable viral load transmitting the virus to a sex partner is scientifically zero

The PARTNER 2 study found no transmissions between gay couples where the HIV-positive partner had a viral load under 200 copies/ml – even though there were nearly 77,000 acts of condomless sex between them.

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Confirmed and needs to be stressed: The chance of any HIV-positive person with an undetectable viral load transmitting the virus to a sexual partner is scientifically equivalent to zero.

This is according to researchers who released at #AIDS2018 the final results from the PARTNER study. Results originally announced in 2014 from the first phase, PARTNER 1, already indicated that “Undetectable equals Untransmittable” (U=U). But while the first study was lauded in tackling vaginal sex, the statistical certainty of the result did not convince everyone, particularly in the case of gay men, or those who engage in anal sex.

But now, PARTNER 2, the second phase, only recruited gay couples. The PARTNER study recruited HIV serodifferent couples (one partner positive, one negative) at 75 clinical sites in 14 European countries. They tested the HIV-negative partners every six to 12 months for HIV, and tested viral load in the HIV-positive partners. Both partners also completed behavioral surveys. In cases of HIV infection in the negative partners, their HIV was genetically analyzed to see if it came from their regular partner.

And the results indicate “a precise rate of within-couple transmission of zero” for gay men as well as for heterosexuals.

The study found no transmissions between gay couples where the HIV-positive partner had a viral load under 200 copies/ml – even though there were nearly 77,000 acts of condomless sex between them.

PARTNER is not the only study about viral load and infectiousness. Last year, the Opposites Attract study also found no transmissions in nearly 17,000 acts of condomless anal sex between serodifferent gay male partners. This means that no transmission has been seen in about 126,000 occasions of sex, if this study is combined with PARTNER 1 and 2.

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While this is good news overall in the fight against HIV, related issues continue to plague HIV-related efforts, particularly in countries like the Philippines.

Why aren’t we talking about ‘undetectable = untransmittable’ in the Philippines?

For instance, aside from the overall silence on U=U (undetectable = untransmittable), use of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) continue to be low. As of May 2016, when the country already had 34,158 total reported cases of HIV infection, Filipinos living with HIV who are on anti-retroviral therapy (i.e. those who are taking meds) only numbered 14,356.

The antiretroviral medicines in use in the Philippines also continue to be limited, with some already phased out in developed countries.

All the same, this is considered a significant stride, with science unequivocally backing the scientific view helmed in 2008 by Dr. Pietro Vernazza who spearheaded the scientific view that viral suppression means HIV cannot be passed via a statement in the Bulletin of Swiss Medicine.

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‘God loves LGBTQIA people; so do we.’

A Christian church wants members of the LGBTQIA community to know that “they are loved by God.” Val Paminiano, pastor of the Freedom in Christ Ministries, says that “we would like to apologize on behalf of the mainstream churches that condemn the LGBTQIA community. Sorry for hurting you; (and) even for using the Bible to hurt you.”

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God’s love is for all.

“(We want the members of the LGBTQIA community to know that) they are loved by God,” said Val Paminiano, pastor of the Freedom in Christ Ministries, which has been making its presence known particularly in LGBTQIA Pride events to highlight its Christian anti-anti-LGBTQIA position.

Approximately 80% of Filipinos are Roman Catholic, and the church’s teachings continue to dominate public life in the Philippines. As it stands, church’s teachings re LGBTQIA people still often revolve around the “hate the sin, love the sinner” statement, so that LGBTQIA people are tolerated so long as they do not express their being LGBTQIA.

This “hate the sin, love the sinner” stance seems to be reflected in dominant perspectives re LGBTQIA people in the Philippines.

In 2013, for instance, in a survey titled “The Global Divide on Homosexuality” conducted by the US-based Pew Research Center, 73% of adult Filipinos agreed with the statement that “homosexuality should be accepted by society”. The percentage of Filipinos who said society should not accept gays fell from 33% in 2002 to 26% that year.

But more recently, in June 2018, a Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed that a big percentage of Filipinos still oppose civil unions. When 1,200 respondents across the country were asked whether or not they agree with the statement “there should be a law that will allow the civil union of two men or two women”, at least 61% of the respondents said they would oppose a bill that would legalize this in the country. Among them, 44% said they strongly disagree, while 17% said they somewhat disagree. Meanwhile, 22% said they would support it, while 16% said they were still “undecided”.

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For Paminiano, “we would like to apologize on behalf of the mainstream churches that condemn the LGBTQIA community. Sorry for hurting you; (and) even for using the Bible to hurt you.”

Churches continue to be lambasted for not changing with time – perhaps most obvious in the treatment of LGBT people of those with faith. But the number of denominations openly discussing – and even coming up with statements of support of – LGBTQIA issues is increasing.

Finding room for #queerinfaith

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