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Cagayan de Oro school allows trans students to wear uniforms aligned with their gender identities

PHINMA – Cagayan De oro College Senior High School is making waves with the release of its pro-LGBTQIA uniform policy that allows transgender students to wear clothes befitting their SOGIESC.

An educational institution in Cagayan de Oro is making waves online with the release of its pro-LGBTQIA uniform policy that allows transgender students to wear clothes befitting their SOGIESC.

Established in 1947, PHINMA – Cagayan De oro College Senior High School is described as a non-sectarian educational institution located on Max Suniel St, Carmen, Cagayan de Oro. PHINMA COC currently has three campuses, all of them in Cagayan de Oro; and since 2005, it has been owned and managed by the PHINMA Group.

PHOTO FROM THE FACEBOOK PAGE OF PHINMA – Cagayan De oro College Senior High School

The school actually has a uniform, and so it stressed that students must “wear modest attire on campus. No crop tops sleeveless, shorts, tattered jeans, leggings, miniskirt, sandals, crocs and slippers.” Nonetheless, in its guidelines on the proper wearing of school uniforms and ID, it allows particularly transgender students to wear the uniform aligned with their gender identity.

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