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Diwata ng Muntinlupa: Celebrating LGBTQIA Pride in the Emerald City of the Philippines

Introducing one of the oldest LGBTQIA organizations in the Philippines, Diwata ng Muntinlupa, which was established in 1977 to advocate for LGBTQIA human rights while offering the members companionship and peer support.

ARTICLE FILED WITH ZOE DENYS GULLON

In 1998, a member of the LGBTQIA community in Muntinlupa City was murdered inside his salon two days before a show he was part of was to take place. The murder made the news (particularly locally), but what may not have been widely circulated was that the murdered person was (then) the sitting president of Diwata ng Muntinlupa, one of the oldest LGBTQIA organizations in the Philippines, having been established in 1977.

“It was rough for us,” recalled Glenn Ricaroz, the current president of Diwata ng Muntinlupa. And yet, the organization’s members went on with holding the already-scheduled show “and brought happiness to the people even when happiness was nowhere near our hearts because of what happened.”

That macabre occurrence highlighted for the members of Diwata ng Muntinlupa why the organization exists in the first place – i.e. advocating for LGBTQIA human rights so that nothing like that could ever happen to LGBTQIA people ever again, but (while doing the advocating) also offering each other companionship and peer support.

As the first LGBTQIA organization in Muntinlupa City, Diwata ng Muntinlupa’s formation was backed by former city mayor Atty. Maximino A. Argana. And in 42 years, it has been “steadfast in its intention to connect, support and represent (the LGBTQIA people) in the eight barangays (villages) in Muntinlupa City.”

Annually, the members support each other in highlighting their “connection” through an already regularized performance for the feast of the Sto. Niño (Child Jesus); a way of showcasing LGBTQIA representation through a religious event. During this event, Diwata ng Muntinlupa becomes “a showcase of talents,” said Ricaroz.

Muntinlupa City (or at least as reported to the leadership of Diwata ng Muntinlupa) is “largely LGBTQIA-friendly,” Ricaroz said. But this does not weaken “our support for the passage of an anti-discrimination law.”

Obviously, as in any law, the implementation could become an issue, but Ricaroz said that the very act of having an anti-discrimination law that will protect the human rights of LGBTQIA people will validate their very being.

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For example, “sa pulis (in the police station), when you report (there), ang treatment naman sa iyo is not bading or tomboy (you are not recognized as gay or lesbian/based on your SOGIE). You are just considered as man or a woman. So what will appear in the records/blotter is ‘pinatay ng lalaki yung kapwa niya lalaki (a man killed another man),” Ricaroz said. This erases not just the identity of LGBTQIA people, but could also inadvertently affect reporting on crimes committed against people because of their SOGIE.

After 42 years, the longevity of the group may be attributed to its ‘survivalist’ attitude. “Kahit sino naupo, nandyan kami (It doesn’t matter who is in power in the local government, we’re still here),” Ricaroz said. This is also a source of pride considering how local organizations are almost always formed and then dismantled only to serve the political dreams/intentions of politicians; they are – therefore – often at the whim of these same politicians. But “(for us), no matter who sits in the local government, Diwata is and will always be there.”

But – perhaps surprising considering the organization’s age; though perhaps unsurprising due to its very nature as a community-based organization – Diwata ng Muntinlupa also continues to face financial issues.

For instance, there are times, said Ricaroz, when “we struggle to keep (the annual show for the Sto. Niño going).” But benefactors almost always step up – e.g. founding member Mama Blanca, the local government, and community members. And “we are always overwhelmed with the support we get. This is why we still keep going.”

Diwata ng Muntinlupa continues to eye growth – e.g. the founding members total less than 20, but regular members now number over 120 people, not including allied LGBTQIA organizations/groups in Muntinlupa City. Meanwhile, there is broadening of efforts being made. After 42 years, it is finally getting itself registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). And aside from the annual show for the Sto. Niño, it is looking into organizing sports events for the LGBTQIA people in their communities, start HIV advocacy efforts HIV; and develop a livelihood and entrepreneurial project for the LGBTQIA community through educational scholarships and TESDA.

“We want to keep the legacy of Diwata ng Muntinlupa going,” Ricaroz said, hoping that – in the end – the organization becomes like the very people its members hold in esteem, inspiring others to be moved into action for LGBTQIA advocacy.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DIWATA NG MUNTINLUPA
PHOTO COURTESY OF DIWATA NG MUNTINLUPA

For LGBTQIA Filipinos in Muntinlupa City who may want to join Diwata ng Muntinlupa, visit and coordinate with the officers via the organization’s Facebook account.

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