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Kapederasyon asserts human rights of LGBTs on International Human Rights Day

Kapederasyon marked the International Human Rights Day in 2014 by lamenting the poor response of the Philippine government to promote the rights and welfare of LGBT Filipinos. “If justice is elusive for Jennifer, Mary Ann, the journalists in Maguindanao, and the farmers of Hacienda Luisita, this government cannot be relied upon in promoting the rights and talents of gays and lesbians in Filipino society,” said Kapederasyon in a statement.

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Kapederasyon

LGBT organiztion Kapederasyon lamented the poor response of the Philippine government to promote the rights and welfare of LGBT Filipinos, as it marked the International Human Rights Day in 2014.

Kung ang hustisya ay mailap sa mga tulad nila Jennifer, Mary Ann, ng mga mamayahag sa Maguindanao, at ng mga magsasaka sa Hacienda Luisita, hinding hindi maaasahan ang gobyernong ito na magtaguyod ng karapatan at kagalingan ng mga bakla at tomboy sa lipunang Pilipino (If justice is elusive for Jennifer, Mary Ann, the journalists in Maguindanao, and the farmers of Hacienda Luisita, this government cannot be relied upon in promoting the rights and talents of gays and lesbians in Filipino society),” said Kapederasyon in a statement.

Kapederasyon added that despite the recent successes of local antidiscrimination ordinances for LGBTS, the Aquino government has yet still to pass the antidiscrimination bill pending in the Congress and Senate.

Maliban sa pang-araw-araw na pasakit ng mataas na bilihin, tubig, kuryente, mataas na tuition sa eskwelahan, at ng kawalang-kasiguruhan sa trabaho, dagdag pasakit ang diskriminasyon na nararanasan ng LGBT sa iba’t ibang institusyon sa lipunan (Aside from the daily burden of the rising prices of basi commodities, water, electricity, high school tuitions, and job insecurity, discrimination of LGBTs in the different sectors of society is an additional burden),” said Kapederasyon.

Kapederasyon sees the Jennifer Laude slay case as a clear message on US-Philippines relations.

Ang gobyerno ng Pilipinas sa porma ng EDCA ay tuta talaga ng gobyerno ng US. Walang pinipiling biktima ang karahasan ng paghahasik ng digma ng Estados Unidos. Mapababae, bakla, o transgender ka man. Tulad ni Jennifer Laude, hindi ka ligtas sa karahasang ito (The Philippine government in the form of EDCA is a lapdog of the US government. The war aggression of the United States does not pick victims of its violence, woman, gay, or transgender. Like Jennifer Laude, no one is safe from this),” Kapederasyon said.

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Kapederasyon argues that Laude’s case is nothing new and is related to some incidents in the past.

Sinong makakalimot sa kaso ng panghahalay kay Nicole noong 2005? Kahit sa ibang bansang may defense agreement ang US, hindi bago ang ganitong kaso. Halimbawa na lamang ay ang panghahalay na ginawa ng dalawang Amerikanong sundalo sa isang babaeng Hapon sa Okinawa noong 2012. Halos normal ang ganitong kaso sa mga bansang binibisita ng mga Amerikanong sundalo sa diwa ng defense agreements. Bakit? Dahil ganito ang kulturang pinayayabong ng paghahasik ng gyera – bayolente at mapagpakasasa. Kaya hindi rin maitatangging malinaw na hate crime ang ginawang pagpatay kay Jennifer Laude. Makikita ito sa paraan ng pagpatay at sa hitsura ni Jennifer nang matagpuan siyang walang buhay at nakasubsob sa inodoro (Who can forget the rape case of Nicole in 2005? Even in other countries the US has defense agreements, cases like these are not new. In 2012, two American soldiers raped a Japanese woman in Okinawa. These cases seem normal in the countries US soldiers visit in the spirit of defense agreements. Why? This is the culture of war aggression – violent and excessive. It can’t also be denied that Jeniffer Laude’s murder was a hate crime. The ways she was killed, and her appearance when she was found dead in the toilet were proof),” Kapederasyon stated.

Kapederasyon added to raise the struggle of LGBT Filipinos by using their creativity in changing society.

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Tulad ng bahaghari, kailangan nating mapagtanto na hindi hiwalay ang isyu ng ibang mamayan sa isyu natin. Ito ang kontekstong ginagalawan ng pakikibaka natin para sa pagkakapantay-pantay (Like the rainbow, we need to realize that other people’s issues are not separate from our issues. This is the context where we struggle for equality),” Kapederasyon ended.

NEWSMAKERS

Many teens are victims of digital dating abuse; boys get the brunt of it

More than one-quarter (28.1 percent) of teens who had been in a romantic relationship at some point in the previous year said they had been the victim of at least one form of digital dating abuse.

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A new research is illuminating how dating violence is manifesting online. “Digital dating abuse” as it has been termed, uses technology to repetitively harass a romantic partner with the intent to control, coerce, intimidate, annoy or threaten them. Given that youth in relationships today are constantly in touch with each other via texting, social media and video chat, more opportunities for digital dating abuse can arise.

A researcher from Florida Atlantic University, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, conducted a study to clarify the extent to which youth are experiencing digital forms of dating abuse, as well as to identify what factors are linked to those experiences.

Research on this phenomenon is still emerging; indeed, this study is the first to examine these behaviors with a large, nationally representative sample of 2,218 middle and high school students (12 to 17 years old) in the United States who have been in a romantic relationship.

Results of the study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, showed that more than one-quarter (28.1 percent) of teens who had been in a romantic relationship at some point in the previous year said they had been the victim of at least one form of digital dating abuse. These included: whether their significant other looked through the contents of their device without permission; kept them from using their device; threatened them via text; posted something publicly online to make fun of, threaten, or embarrass them; and posted or shared a private picture of them without permission.

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In addition, more than one-third (35.9 percent) had been the victim at least one form of traditional (offline) dating abuse (i.e., they were pushed, grabbed or shoved; hit or threatened to be hit; called names or criticized, or prevented from doing something they wanted to do).

Interestingly, males were significantly more likely to have experienced digital dating abuse (32.3 percent) compared to females (23.6 percent), and more likely to experience all types of digital dating abuse, and were even more likely to experience physical aggression. No other differences emerged with respect to demographic characteristics such as sexual orientation, race and age.

“Specific to heterosexual relationships, girls may use more violence on their boyfriends to try to solve their relational problems, while boys may try to constrain their aggressive impulses when trying to negotiate discord with their girlfriends,” said Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., lead author and a professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice within FAU’s College for Design and Social Inquiry, and co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center. “It’s unfortunate to be thinking about dating abuse as we approach one of the most romantic days of the year, Valentine’s Day. However, it is clear that digital dating abuse affects a meaningful proportion of teenagers, and we need to model and educate youth on what constitutes a healthy, stable relationship and what betrays a dysfunctional, problematic one.”

The researchers also found a significant connection between digital and traditional forms of dating abuse: the vast majority of students who had been abused online had also been abused offline. Specifically, 81 percent of the students who had been the target of digital dating abuse had also been the target of traditional dating abuse.

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Students victimized offline were approximately 18 times more likely to have also experienced online abuse compared to those who were not victimized offline. Similarly, most of the students who had been the victim of offline dating violence also had been the victim of online dating violence, though the proportion (63 percent) was lower.

A number of risk factors were significantly associated with digital dating abuse. Students who reported depressive symptoms were about four times as likely to have experienced digital dating abuse. Those who reported that they had sexual intercourse were 2.5 times as likely to have experienced digital dating abuse. Most notably, those students who had sent a “sext” to another person were nearly five times as likely to be the target of digital dating abuse as compared to those who had not sent a sext. Finally, those who had been the target of cyberbullying also were likely to have been the target of digital dating abuse.

Hinduja said: “Gaining a deeper understanding of the emotional and psychological mind-set and the situational circumstances of current-day adolescents may significantly inform the policy and practice we need to develop to address this form and all forms of dating abuse.”

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NEWSMAKERS

City of Manila co-opts LGBTQIA pride; to hold tourism-centric event

In the City of Manila, where there is still no anti-discrimination ordinance (ADO) protecting the human rights of members of the LGBTQIA community, the local government is slated to hold its tourism-centric “Manila Summer Pride” celebration at Burnham Green at the Quirino Grandstand on April 19.

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Screencap from the Facebook page of the Department of Tourism, Culture and Arts of Manila

Tone-deaf event for tourists using the LGBTQIA community as lure?

In the City of Manila, where there is still no anti-discrimination ordinance (ADO) protecting the human rights of members of the LGBTQIA community, the local government (LGU) under the leadership of former actor and product endorser Mayor Isko Moreno is slated to hold its first “Manila Summer Pride” celebration at Burnham Green at the Quirino Grandstand on April 19.

Themed “Awra Na,” the event – done through the city’s Department of Tourism, Culture and Arts of Manila (DTCAM) – is said to “showcase ang diversity sa Lungsod ng Maynila.” DTCAM also stated that the event is the LGU’s way of expressing its support to the LGBTQIA community.

https://www.facebook.com/DTCAM2020/posts/511090726211959

According to DTCAM, “the Manila Summer Pride will be the first pride celebration organized by the City Government of Manila and we are honored to host this historical event.” But earlier, DTCAM stressed that the event is open even to those who are not LGBTQIA to include allies, and that it’s for people who “support love and equality, no matter what gender.”

Since pride celebrations are usually done in June, marking the Stonewall Inn Riots that happened in New York in 1969, largely considered as the impetus of the modern LGBTQIA movement, the LGU’s decision to hold its version of pride in April is because it believes that pride should be celebrated “anywhere and anytime of the year.”

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“Pride… in June are known all across the world and we understand that this also signifies unity among the LGBTQIA community members globally. However, times are changing and even in other countries and places in the Philippines, Pride (events) are now being conducted in different months and we believe that as a movement, it is due to be celebrated anywhere and anytime of the year,” DTCAM stated.

According to Michael David C. Tan, editor of Outrage Magazine and concurrent executive director of Manila City-based Bahaghari Center for SOGIE Research, Education and Advocacy, Inc. (Bahaghari Center), the LGU’s version of pride is problematic on many sides.

“No one will question efforts that eye to give attention to minority sectors – such as the LGBTQIA community – that continue to experience hardships,” Tan said. However, “when an effort that claims to be for a certain sector does not even know what that sector really needs, then there’s an issue.”

Manila’s LGU may be accused of “co-opting” the LGBTQIA struggle, Tan said, by focusing on “just selling it as a for-tourism event, particularly since the city still does not have an ADO.”

For Tan, “partying is cool; but we need rights”. So if Moreno is “really serious about wanting to support the LGBTQIA community, he should focus on passing an ADO, which will longer-lasting, life-changing effects on his LGBTQIA constituents’ lives.”

Tan added that the decision to hold the gathering in April solely because the organizers see pride as a celebration that can be done anytime, anywhere is therefore “tone deaf” because “for as long as LGBTQIA people are treated as less than their heterosexual counterparts, then pride remains a protest, a struggle” and “not mere celebration.”

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PNP should stop all forms of profiling – Sen. Binay

Sen. Nancy Binay urged the Philippine National Police (PNP) to end all kinds of profiling that target specific individuals or groups based on appearance, political beliefs, religion, ethnicity, gender identity or sexual orientation.

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Screencap from the Twitter page of Sen. Nancy Binay

Philippine Sen. Nancy Binay urged the Philippine National Police (PNP) to end all kinds of profiling that target specific individuals or groups based on appearance, political beliefs, religion, ethnicity, gender identity or sexual orientation.

Binay issued the call for a “standing policy banning operations with a gender or political bias” after a transgender woman claimed she was “profiled” by Makati cops under “Oplan X-Men.”

For Binay, police profiling “borders on grave abuse”, particularly since even innocent law-abiding citizens have been wrongly arrested or accused of crimes.

In a statement, Binay said: “Pipilitin kang sumama sa presinto at kukunin ang personal na impormasyon mo na wala namang malinaw o legal na dahilan. Bakit, may kaso ba? May complaint ba? May krimen bang nagawa? Warrantless arrest ba ito? (Cops force you to come to their police station and get your personal information without clear and legal reasons. Why? Do you have a case? Is there a complaint? Did you commit a crime? Is this a warrantless arrest?)”

Binay questioned gender profiling, red- or prostitute-tagging and the propriety of arresting people on the basis of observed characteristics or behavior.

For Binay, “dahil sa mali-maling profiling, people’s rights have been trampled. Sana huwag nang pamarisan pa ang pangyayaring ito ng ibang local police (because of wrong profiling, people’s rights have been trampled. I hope other local police don’t follow suit).”

Binay added that “police should be accountable for abusive practices.”

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The senator is urging to the PNP and other law enforcement agencies to have a “clear and enforceable policy” ending bigotry, particularly institutionalized homophobia and transphobia, in their organizations. She suggested that cops undergo gender awareness and sensitivity training to avoid further malicious and unsubstantiated arrests.

Earlier, Makati City police chief Rogelio Simon said that profiling operations are not wrong per se; but because of the ruckus created by Operation X-Men, the two cops involved in an incident wherein a transgender woman was wrongfully almost forced to be profiled were fired.

As per an Inquirer.net report, too, National Capital Region Police Office (NCRPO) chief Maj. Gen. Debold Sinas said that the agency will continue its profiling operations as this was the directive of the PNP chief.

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LOVE AFFAIRS

Same-sex wedding held in British Embassy Manila

British Ambassador Daniel Pruce officiated a same-sex wedding in the British embassy in Manila, marking not only Valentine’s Day but the 87th same-sex marriage conducted in the premises.

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Screencap from the British Embassy Manila FB page

#LoveWins

British Ambassador Daniel Pruce officiated a same-sex wedding in the British embassy in Manila, marking not only Valentine’s Day but the 87th same-sex marriage conducted in the premises.

In a Facebook post, British Embassy Manila claimed: “Love is in the air! Congratulations to Mark and Richard who were married by Ambassador Daniel Pruce on #ValentinesDay. We wish you a lifetime of love and happiness.”

It is worth noting that while same-sex marriage is not outright banned by the Philippine Constitution, the country’s Family Code limits marriage as a sacrament between one man and one woman.

However, foreign embassies are given extraterritorial privileges under the Geneva Convention. These include immunity from intrusion, damage and disturbance by the host countries.

Same-sex marriage was legalized in Great Britain in 2014; and so the embassy said the UK “continues to champion the rights and equal treatment of all regardless of gender.”

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NEWSMAKERS

Makati City police now – apparently – profiling members of LGBTQIA community

The practice of profiling members of the LGBTQIA community is – apparently – actually already part of the implemented practices of Makati City’s police via its “Operation X-Men.”

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Screencap from Makati City police's SCADS

On February 14, transgender woman Anne Pelos was walking along Makati Ave. in Makati City, when she was stopped by a police officer who wanted her to go with him to the police station. Asked why, Pelos was told Makati police was instructed to to bring in transgender people (in this case in particular, transgender women) “for profiling.”

Though Pelos – who works in the business process outsourcing (BPO) industry – was able to walk away from the traumatizing incident with her friends documenting/recording what transpired, the practice of profiling members of the LGBTQIA community is – apparently – actually already part of the implemented practices of Makati City’s police via its “Operation X-Men.”

In January, in an earlier post in Facebook, Makati police’s Station Community Affairs and Development Section (SCADS) stated that “Oplan X-Men is an intensified operation that aims to rescue ladyboys (sic) from exploitation and human trafficking in ill-repute areas.”

On January 22, at 11:52 PM, for that matter, the city’s police “invited” 67 individuals to the Makati City Police Station, with those invited coming from “illegal settlers inside Manila South Cemetery” and as a result of “Oplan X-Men at Burgos, Poblacion, Makati City.”

As reported, the rounding up of people was “conducted through the combined efforts of Station Operations, Women’s Desk, Station Intelligence and Station and Drug Enforcement Unit.”

According to the Commission on Human Rights (CHR), which has started investigating “Oplan X-Men”, the CHR recognizes incidents in which the police may “invite” individuals to their headquarters. However, “the public should exercise caution, as these may be used to effect warrantless arrests,” CHR spokesperson Jacqueline de Guia was quoted as saying by Inquirer.net.

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De Guia added that “this recent incident further highlights the violence and harassment experienced every day by the LGBTQI community because of their sexual orientation and gender identity (and expression).”

On her Facebook recollection of the incident, Pelos surmised that she was targeted because of what she was wearing (i.e. a white tube dress, which may be stereotypically associated with what sex workers in the area also wear).

But Pelos said that “I have an honest and decent job…” adding that “you should not just judge all trans people and drag them to the police precinct.”

On February 17, following the ruckus caused by the profiling, the two cops (Patrolman Timmy Paez and Police Corporal Juliel Atal) who invited Pelos to their headquarters after accosting her as she was walking home along Makati Avenue were supposedly fired.

Also, surprisingly, even after SCAD’s earlier mention of the same, Makati City police chief Rogelio Simon also told news outlet Rappler that Oplan X-Men was not a part of any police activity in Makati.

This is not the first ill-conceived attempt to profile members of the LGBTQIA community.

In 2017, former Quezon City mayor Herbert Bautista issued a memorandum to task the heads of the local government unit’s various offices to profile “all employees who belong to the (LGBTQIA community)… regardless of the employment agreement.”

Incidentally, Nazi Germany also profiled members of the LGBTQIA community; and under the Third Reich, it is estimated that approximately 100,000 men were arrested for homosexuality, of which around 5,000-15,000 were sent to concentration camps.

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For CHR’s De Guia, the incident stresses “the need to pass the SOGIE Equality Bill to penalize all forms of discrimination.”

The proposed bill that eyes to protect the human rights of members of the LGBTQIA community continues to languish in Congress after two decades.

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Women in leadership positions face more sexual harassment

Power in the workplace does not stop women’s exposure to sexual harassment. On the contrary, women with supervisory positions are harassed more than women employees.

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Photo by Isabella Mariana from Pexels.com

Power in the workplace does not stop women’s exposure to sexual harassment. On the contrary, women with supervisory positions are harassed more than women employees. These are the results from a new study from the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University, which examined the conditions in Sweden, USA and Japan.

Written by Folke, O., Rickne, J., Tanaka, S., & Tateishi, Y., Sexual Harassment of Women Leaders appeared in Daedalus.

By analyzing the responses from three surveys, researchers at the Swedish Institute for Social Research, SOFI, at Stockholm University, together with fellow American and Japanese researchers, have studied the prevalence of sexual harassment across the organizational hierarchy. The study shows that women with supervisory positions experienced between 30 and 100 per cent more sexual harassment than other women employees. This was true across the United States, Japan, and Sweden, three countries with different gender norms and levels of gender equality in the labour market. Comparing levels of leadership, exposure to harassment was greatest at lower levels of leadership, but remained substantial and similar to the level of harassment for the highest positions.

“When we first started to study sexual harassment, we expected a higher exposure for women with less power in the workplace. Instead we found the contrary. When you think about it, there are logical explanations: a supervisor is exposed to new groups of potential perpetrators. She can be harassed both from her subordinates and from higher-level management within the company. More harassment from these two groups is also what we saw when we asked the women who had harassed them,” says Johanna Rickne, Professor of Economics at SOFI.

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In all three countries, women with supervisory positions were subject to more harassment when their subordinates consisted of mostly men.

“Sexual harassment means that women’s career advancement comes at a higher cost than men’s, especially in male-dominated industries and firms. Additional survey data from the United States and Japan showed that harassment of supervisors was not only more common than for employees, but was also followed by more negative professional and social consequences. This included getting a reputation of being a ‘trouble maker’ and missing out on promotions or training,” says Olle Folke, affiliated researcher at SOFI and associate professor at Uppsala University.

The study addressed the risk of measurement error from different awareness of sexual harassment among supervisors and employees. Questions on whether or not particular behaviours should, or should not, be defined as harassment showed similar answers in the two groups. This makes it unlikely that the results derive from different perceptions of work interactions, rather than different treatment in those interactions.

The study used two different measurement tools. The surveys in the United States and Japan included the Sexual Experiences Questionnaire, a survey instrument with a list of behaviours, developed for studies in the US military. All three countries were also surveyed with subjective questions about whether the person had been exposed to sexual harassment. The time span for all questions was the previous 12 months.

The Swedish results come from five waves of the Swedish Work Environment Survey, a nationally representative dataset collected biannually by Statistics Sweden (1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, and 2007) and with a total of 23,994 female respondents. In the United States and Japan, the research team collected new survey material during 2019. The US sample included 1,573 employed female citizens, whereof 62 per cent had supervisory positions, while the Japanese sample included 1,573 respondents, of which 17 per cent of the women were in supervisory positions. Apart from questions about sexual harassments, respondents were asked about perpetrators, how they reacted to the harassment, and what social and professional consequences followed the victimization.

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