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Magdalena Robinson: Not your ordinary beauty queen

Meet Magdalena Robinson, a beauty queen turned LGBTQI activist, who highlights the difficulties encountered by members of the LGBTQI community in central Philippines. “Please don’t ignore our reports, complaints and even our visits in your offices. We are never a nuisance but your proactive partner in your move to uphold and promote basic human rights for all people,” says the founder of Cebu United Rainbow LGBT Sector.

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By Magdalena Robinson

PHOTO BY TROY ESPIRITU, COURTESY OF MAGDALENA ROBINSON

PHOTO BY TROY ESPIRITU, COURTESY OF MAGDALENA ROBINSON

The lady speaking before all of you is a proud transgender woman and a beauty queen. I am Magdalena Robinson, coming all the way from the queenly city of the south, Cebu, in central Philippines.

It’s not all just beauty and glamour that you see in me. Each day of my life has been subjected to difficult, traumatic and some terrible experiences from my past, present – though hopefully not in my future.

One unforgettable incident happened sometime in 2013. After a pageant, I was waiting for a bus to go back home and a man passed by behind me and suddenly hit me with a very strong punch at my back for no reason. That moment caused a commotion in the neighborhood, though the people advised me to just go home since that guy was known to be violent in their community. So I went home with a pain at my back, traumatized and with a heavy heart for not getting any justice, and in fear for my life.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAGDALENA ROBINSON

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MAGDALENA ROBINSON

But I’m not here for beauty and drama. I’m here to share with you a positive story that happened in our locality. Way before my organization started its actions back 2010, there were already negative incidents that made big news in our island.

In 2001, the human rights commission dismissed a complaint by a transwoman who was refused entry due to a club’s dress code/policy for its patrons. In 2008, Janjan, a gay man, filed a case against members of a hospital staff for illegally publishing a video during the operation that saw the removal of a perfume canister in his rectum; that video showed the medical team giggling and laughing at the operating room. Sometime from the 7th to 13th of October in 2011, 13 transgender women reported being targeted by an unidentified vehicle whose passengers shot them using pellets. And then there are the brutal killings of our trans sisters – Francis Lariosa was stabbed and her throat slit in 2003; Bernadette was killed with her face crushed in 2005; Sima, a trans youth, was stabbed to her death on her way to watch a pageant in 2007; Pinpin was stabbed to death with an icepick in 2010; Danica was stabbed 14 times in 2010; and Luningning was hit with a bat until she died, with that same bat reportedly inserted in her anus, and right before the Pride March revival in 2011.

READ:  All Out

With those pressing concerns, we realized that stage could serve to increase awareness about our issues; but we also realized that lofty answers to the Q&A portions of the pageants we joined never really went beyond the stage.  We wanted to translate our pageant answers to actions.

That was when we were invited to a stakeholders’ consultation and luckily met Councilor Alvin Dizon of the Cebu City Council. He agreed and committed to sponsor a local law to address LGBT issues, especially discrimination.

From then on, the community became active, speaking with the local government and other stakeholders. The lobbying lasted for 11 months, when a number of consultations were conducted, Pride March was revived, a Cebu LGBT congress convened, and localized efforts of international LGBT events (such World Civil Rights March and IDAHOT) were held along with other campaigns in barangays and schools. We also formed alliances in the city council, with a total of six authors agreeing to be co-authors of the local legislation. I sat as one of the members of the technical working group and pushed for the inclusion of other vulnerable sectors since discrimination is multi-dimensional. It wasn’t easy as we went through the process.

There were two legislators who posed their reservations, and the church was vocal in its opposition to the law in the media. But on October 17, 2012, the final reading came and the council unanimously approved the first comprehensive anti-discrimination ordinance in the Philippines.

The ordinance provided the Cebuano LGBTI people the redress we need during instances of discrimination, and a legal language that recognizes experiences of discrimination of diverse people of sexual orientations and gender identities. It mandated the city to develop and implement counter-discrimination programs.

READ:  Aldrin Ng: On being gay, Muslim and living with HIV

An Anti-Discrimination Commission ordinance was also passed in 2014 and have already been appropriated a budget for its 2015 implementation. It is still a challenge to make it a working ordinance. There are still reports of discrimination incidences but no one wants to come out and file a formal complaint. There’s continuing community partnership and constant collaboration with the city legislature in government activities.

Another progress is cooking up the neighboring city’s anti-discrimination legislation. The Mandaue City Council unanimously approved on its first reading the proposed Diversity Code/LGBTIQ Code of Mandaue last February 11, 2015. This ordinance reaffirms the principles of human rights of LGBTI people and recognition as a sector. Also included are provisions on anti-discrimination, integration and inclusivity of LGBTI in city programs and implementation. A Diversity Affairs Office is mandated to implement programs for the empowerment of the sector.

As of the moment, we are optimistic for the ordinance to get adopted. So now, I am calling the help of national human rights institutions and State agencies to issue official directives supporting local policies on equality and non discrimination in the government. This is a way to help lesbian, gay, bisexual, intersex and trans advocates like me in my work in lobbying for LGBTI-affirmative policies in the ground. The government should also be the bridge in engaging the private sector.

Please don’t ignore our reports, complaints and even our visits in your offices. We are never a nuisance but your proactive partner in your move to uphold and promote basic human rights for all people.

READ:  Robin Tomas: Pinoy Pride on the world stage

This is the speech delivered by Magdalena Robinson at the regional dialogue on LGBTI rights and health in Asia and the Pacific, held in Bangkok, Thailand. Robinson is the founder of Cebu United Rainbow LGBT Sector (CURLS).

People You Should Know

Emma Watson highlights LGBTQI support, wears ‘trans rights are human rights’ t-shirt

The 28-year-old ‘Harry Potter’ actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

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Emma Watson highlighted her support for the LGBTQI community via a new social media post.

The 28-year-old Harry Potter actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

The move may be deemed small, but – at least in raising the issue – this ought to count, considering Watson has 48 million followers in Instagram alone. As of press time, it already had over a million likes.

 

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💖✊🏻 @stonewalluk @mermaidsgender @genderedintelligence

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Watson’s message appears to be in response to the UK government’s discussion of the Gender Recognition Act (GRA). Trans activists are calling for the GRA to be reformed for it to recognize non-binary identities and makes it easier to legally self-determine gender for trans people of all ages, including an end to requiring that trans statuses be dependent upon medical diagnosis or approval.

This is not the first time Watson showed her support for the LGBTQI community.

In the past, she also wrote about LGBT History Month on Instagram: “It’s 🏳️‍🌈 LGBT History Month in the USA. I have learned so much about feminism and anti-racism through the work of LGBTQIA+ activists. Thank you Sylvia Rivera, Audre Lorde and Marsha P. Johnson!! Sending love to all those I love and wider LGBTQIA+ communities around the world.”

Watson also spearheaded the HeForShe campaign for feminism. Speaking at the UN in 2014, she said: “If we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by what we are — we can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom.”

READ:  ‘Destiny Rose’ star Ken Chan says he’s lucky if the LGBT community wants him as pro-equality spokesperson

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To live a life in service

Meet Carla Culaste, the trans houseparent of a halfway house for people living with HIV in the City of Manila. It’s a challenging – and yet fulfilling – job, he said, as he stressed to others to learn more about HIV to promote non-discrimination.

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This is part of #KaraniwangLGBT, which Outrage Magazine officially launched on July 26, 2015 to offer vignettes of LGBT people/living, particularly in the Philippines, to give so-called “everyday people” – in this case, the common LGBT people – that chance to share their stories.
As Outrage Magazine editor Michael David C. Tan says: “All our stories are valid – not just the stories of the ‘big shots’. And it’s high time we start telling all our stories.”

Carla Culaste, now 26, was around 12 years old when he first visited the Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI). His sister worked for the non-government organization that was founded by his gay uncle, Joshua Formentera. Even then, he said that he was always “impressed” with how it was able to touch the lives of Filipino PLHIVs, providing them a “safe space” when even their own homes failed to do so.

Little did he know that – by the time he’d turn 22 – he’d be working as the houseparent of the NGO’s Abot Kamay Center, a halfway house for PLHIVs who are in need of a helping hand to get back on their feet.

DAILY ROUTINE

From Monday to Friday, Carla sleeps at the center. On weekends, he heads home (in Parañaque, where his family lives). But even if his work is actually supposedly only from 8:00AM to 5:00PM, “as a houseparent, 27/7 ka nakabantay (I watch after them 24/7).”

Part of Carla’s job is to “always check on the clients” – from checking if they have supplies of their medicines, if they actually take their medicines on time, if they eat properly, et cetera. This is particularly true when dealing with new clients who may still have physical limitations and need help in their day-to-day living in the shelter.

READ:  Aldrin Ng: On being gay, Muslim and living with HIV

Aside from this, Carla also helps manage clients who may need to be rushed to the hospital, particularly when “wala silang pamilya na willing tumulong sa kanila (if they don’t have family willing to help them).” By extension, therefore, Carla becomes an alternative family member.

Iniisip ko kasi, bilang houseparent, hindi lang ako nanay o tatay sa kanila (As a houseparent, I do not only see myself as a father or a mother to them), Carla said. “Ano rin ako sa kanila… kapatid, kaibigan na puwede nilang takbuhan pag kailangan nila ng makakausap (I am also a sibling, a friend to them; someone they can go to if they need to talk to someone).”

But it is a fulfilling job, particularly when he sees people he helped do well in life. “Nakakasaya rin (It makes one happy),” he said.

GROWING UP TRANS

Carla didn’t finish high school; though if given a chance, he’d like to study again.

As a trans man, his life was not always easy.

The youngest of six kids, he always identified as a trans man.

“Before, hindi nila ako matanggap (In the past, my family couldn’t accept me),” he said. “Against sa religion nila (Being LGBTQIA was against their religion).”

As a child, two of his borther also bullied him; they hurt him verbally, as well as physically.

When he told his parents about it, they just dismissed the bullying, telling Carla that perhaps “naglalambing lang sila (they were just being affectionate)”.

READ:  #KaraniwangLGBT: My life as a beautician

But Carla said he still chose to be what he is because this is what makes him happy.

By the time Carla had his first partner, “wala na rin sila nagawa (there was nothing they could do but accept me).”

In hindsight, that experience taught Carla an important lesson in life: To be accepting.

Kung paano mo i-treat ang tao… ipakita mo sa kanila na kaya mo silang intindihin kahit magkaiba kayo (In treating people, show them that you can understand them even if you’re different from each other),” Carla said.

EVERYONE’S ISSUE

With her exposure to the HIV community, Carla wants PLHIVs to learn to care for themselves. For instance, not to do things (e.g.vices) that will – in the end – just be bad on/for them. “Huwag matigas ang ulo (Don’t be hardheaded),” he said.

To everyone, he said “huwag kayong matakot sa PLHIVs (don’t be afraid of PLHIVs).” In fact, “matuto tayong sumuporta (sa PLHIVs) hindi lang sa kamag-anak natin (na may HIV). Maging concern din tayo sa iba. Iwasan natin ang discrimination (We should learn to support PLHIVs, not just relatives who may have it. We should show our concern to everyone. We should avoid discrimination).”

Learning also helps, he said, “at bigyan natin ng kaalaman sarili natin tungkol sa HIV kasi dagdag impormasyon yan para sa atin (and for us to add to our knowledge everything about HIV since this is good to our lifelong learning).”

READ:  LGBTQ-themed display ads drive stronger brand recall, according to study

For more information on Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI), visit Abot Kamay Center at 2613 Dian St., Malate, City of Manila, 1004 Philippines.
They may also be reached at (+632) 4042911; or email pafpiorg@gmail.com.

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NEWSMAKERS

Heart Evangelista pushes for non-discrimination of LGBTQI people

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

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#LoveIsAllWeNeed

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

In an Instagram post, Evangelista said that “everyone has the right to live, work and dream”, and that “the SOGIE (Equality Bill) is a step in the right direction to guarantee the protection of those rights, especially for our friends in the LGBTQIA+ community.”

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

Evangelista added that “last year the bill made great progress but we still have a long way to go.” This is why “my husband and I are in full support of this bill and hope to see it move forward and become a law.”

Escudero himself has been vocal about his support for the LGBTQI community.

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In 2012, he took part in the “I dare to care about equality”, a photographic campaign spearheaded by the Bahaghari Center for SOGIE Research, Education and Advocacy (Bahaghari Center). Then while running for the VP post last election, he expressed his support for civil union for same-sex couples.

Evangelista’s IG post has already been liked over 80,000 times.

Sen. Chiz Escudero stresses ‘our duty to ensure equality’

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NEWSMAKERS

Karen Davila expresses support for anti-discrimination bill

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

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#LoveIsAllWeNeed

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

In a Twitter post that – as of press time – has been shared over 160 times, Davila said that the bill “seeks to protect individuals against sex and gender-based discrimination, which include denial of access to public and health services, employment and education.”

Davila then posted a photo of herself wearing a rainbow pin on her collar.


Davila is actually a vocal LGBTQI advocate.

Earlier, in 2016, Davila received the Bahaghari Media Awards from Outrage Magazine for helping inform/educate the public about LGBTQIA-related issues, thereby aiding in bettering the plight of LGBTQIA people particularly in the Philippines.

Bahaghari Media Awards 2016 celebrates LGBTQIA allies in media

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People You Should Know

Jason Mraz opens up about his ‘two spirit’ sexuality, admits having experiences with men

‘I’m Yours’ singer Jason Mraz opened up about his sexuality by saying that he had experiences with men, even while he was dating the woman who became his wife. His wife “laid it out” for him, Mraz said, by calling it ‘Two Spirit’. “I really like that.”

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Screencap of Jason Mraz from the YouTube video of 'I'm Yours'

“I’m Yours” singer Jason Mraz, 41, opened up about his sexuality by revealing that “I’ve had experiences with men, even while I was dating the woman who became my wife.”

Interviewed by Billboard, Mraz said that “it was like, ‘Wow, does that mean I am gay?’”

His wife for three years now, Christina Carano, helped him embrace his sexual identity.

“My wife laid it out for me. She calls it ‘Two Spirit,’ which is what the Native Americans call someone who can love both man and woman,” Mraz said. “I really like that.”

The term “Two Spirit” was coined in the 1990s at a conference for gay and lesbian Native Americans as an umbrella term with no specific description of gender or sexual orientation, according to the New York Times.

Mraz has actually opened up about his sexuality even prior to this. In 2005, for instance, he told Genre that he was “bisexually open-minded” when he told the publication that “I have never been in a sexual relationship with a man. If the right one came along, then sure.”

In 2012, he also indicated that he wasn’t comfortable with labels. “Were we to live in a society that was equal those labels wouldn’t really exist or matter except maybe at the DMV or someplace where, for some reason, you have to put down gender, race or age,” he said to Pride Source. “I don’t get it. I don’t get why sexuality has to be such a big deal.”

READ:  Dana: 'Give yourself happiness'

Just this June, in time for the observance of Pride, Mraz wrote a Pride-themed poem, where a line stated: “I am bi your side”. Mraz said that he “didn’t realize (it) was going to be so telling”.

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The young believer

For Ian Jaurigue, it is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support the LGBTQI community these days. “But as long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” he said.

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“As long as there are LGBT advocates who will fight tirelessly for the advancement of our advocacy, things will get better.”

So said 19-year-old Ian Jaurigue, a self-identified “gender advocate”.

And Ian believes that “(the older generation) did a good job when it comes to working for the advocacy, and we need to learn from their experiences and be grateful for it. If they did not start it, the advocacy would not have had moved forward.”

According to Ian, the young advocates today still have a lot to do; and for Ian, this is “not just talk and rant about (the issues).”

But while recognizing the efforts of those who helped start the movement, Ian also recognizes that there are gaps. And these gaps are not helped by the “disconnect” between his generation and the one before it.

“The struggles may have evolved and revolutionized, but we, the younger generation, still need to reflect and learn from what they have accomplished,” he said. Only “by doing this (will we be helped to) have a stronger grasp of our advocacy.”

Also, even if the LGBTQI movement has reached new heights, according to Ian, the young advocates today still have a lot to do; and for Ian, this is “not just talk and rant about (the issues).”

“It is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support us. But it does not mean that we should settle for these little triumphs. As long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” Ian said.

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Incidentally, Ian is also a freelance makeup artist, theater and indie actor, dancer, a student at U.P. Diliman, and… a drag artist. He is known in the drag community as – plainly – Mrs Tan.

“My style is a mixture of dance, comedy, and theater,” Ian said.

Though he is still new in the world of drag, Ian believes that the way he carries himself and how he performs onstage prove that “age is nothing but a number”.

Ian merges his advocacy with his performances, making sure that “every performance brings a certain message and not just a spectacle. I like the feeling when I’m able to give a deeper message to the audience while I’m performing,” he said.

His first foray into the world of drag was when he joined U.P. Samaskom’s Live AIDS. Ian took on the role of a drag queen. But he felt, during that time, that “drag should be more than what I did in Live AIDS; there should be meaning to it.”

Whenever he performs, “I feel a sense of fulfillment and liberation. I’m not just entertaining people, I’m also giving them something to think about. There is pride to it.”

For someone as young as Ian, “Pride is both a celebration and a revolution.”

On the one hand, it is a celebration of the LGBT community’s diversity, accomplishments, and ongoing contributions. But on the other hand, “Pride is also a protest for the members who are not able to take advantage and enjoy their basic human rights, and for those who have died because they are members of the LGBTQI community,” Ian ended.

“It is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support us. But it does not mean that we should settle for these little triumphs. As long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” Ian said.

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