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Russian Supreme Court bans ‘LGBTQ movement’

The Russian Supreme Court declared what it called the “international LGBTQ movement” an extremist organization, banned all activities associated with it in that country.

Photo by Ivan Lapyrin from Unsplash.com

Making LGBTQIA hate official in Russia.

The Russian Supreme Court declared what it called the “international LGBTQ movement” an extremist organization, banned all activities associated with it in that country.

This move favored the motion that was filed by the Ministry of Justice, which claimed that the LGBTQIA community risked “inciting social and religious discord”, which violates Russia’s Law on Countering Extremism.

Interestingly, no elaboration was provided on what is meant by the “movement.” But in Russia, any organization designated as extremist faces immediate dissolution, with its leaders facing charges of up to 10 years in prison.

The decision is effective immediately.

Although homosexuality was decriminalized in Russia in 1993, the country has numerous anti-LGBTQIA laws – e.g. in 2013, a law was passed banning the dissemination of LGBTQIA-related information to minors; in December 2022, a law was passed to make it illegal for anyone to promote same-sex relationships or suggest that non-heterosexual orientations are “normal”; and in July 2023, a law was passed to ban doctors from conducting gender affirmation surgeries in children (except in cases related to treating congenital physiological anomalies).

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