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South Korea court upholds ban on same-sex relations in military

In South Korea, the constitutional court upheld a law banning same-sex relations in the military. This is because same-sex relationships could – supposedly – harm troops’ combat-readiness and undermine discipline. The court – while did not specifying “same-sex intercourse” – banned “anal intercourse”, grouping this with “indecent acts”.

Photo by Jimmy Moon from Unsplash.com

Shoot to kill allowed, but loving isn’t?

In South Korea, the constitutional court upheld a law banning same-sex relations in the military. This is because same-sex relationships could – supposedly – harm troops’ combat-readiness and undermine discipline. The court – while did not specifying “same-sex intercourse” – banned “anal intercourse”, grouping this with “indecent acts”.

Supposed to make this better: Same-sex intercourse between civilians is “still” not a crime.

In South Korea, military service is compulsory, with all able-bodied men aged 18 to 28 required to render service for about 20 months.

But for the fourth time since 2002 that the court decided on this issue, it once again upheld the existing anti-LGBTQIA law. Men who will be found violating this by falling in love or engaging in sexual activities with other men while rendering military service will be jailed for up to two years.

This time around, the court – in a five-to-four vote – ruled that article 92-6 of the military criminal act was constitutional. The act does not explicitly refer to same-sex intercourse but bans “anal intercourse” or “any other indecent act” during service.

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