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Tokyo now accepting applications under same-sex partnership system

Japan actually does not legally recognize same-sex marriage. Nonetheless, a certificate under this system will recognize such relationships, granting them some of the rights enjoyed by heterosexual couples.

Photo by Alex Knight from Unsplash.com

The Tokyo metropolitan government started accepting applications for the so-called Tokyo Partnership Oath System that will allow sexual minority couples to obtain a certificate that will enable them to apply for municipal housing and be briefed on their partner’s medical condition at municipal hospitals.

Japan actually does not legally recognize same-sex marriage. Nonetheless, a certificate under this system will recognize such relationships, granting them some of the rights enjoyed by heterosexual couples.

The program will officially launch on November 1.

To apply, at least one partner must be a sexual minority, as well as live/reside, work or attend a school in Tokyo. Couples should be legal adults.

Applicants with a child also have the option to include their child’s name on their certificate.

The system does not limit the nationality of the applicants as long as the other requirements are met.

To date, nine prefectures in Japan have already introduced some form of partnership system – i.e. Aomori, Akita, Ibaraki, Tochigi, Gunma, Mie, Osaka, Fukuoka and Saga.

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