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Uganda passes bill to criminalize identifying as LGBTQIA, imposes death penalty for some offenses

Ugandan lawmakers approved one of the world’s harshest anti-LGBTQIA laws, imposing up to 20 years in prison for those who identify as LGBTQIA, and making some crimes punishable by death.

Uganda’s extremist lawmakers want to kill the gays.

Ugandan lawmakers approved one of the world’s harshest anti-LGBTQIA laws, imposing up to 20 years in prison for those who identify as LGBTQIA, and making some crimes punishable by death.

Same-sex relations are already illegal and punishable by life imprisonment in this country where many – including extremist “Christian” lawmakers – see homosexuality as a Western construct, and yet practices Christianity that was introduced to this country by Westerners. There are also bans on promoting and abetting homosexuality, as well as conspiracy to engage in homosexuality.

Photo by Random Institute from Unsplash.com

Lawmaker Asuman Basalirwa introduced The Anti Homosexuality Bill 2023 to “protect our church culture; the legal, religious and traditional family values of Ugandans from the acts that are likely to promote sexual promiscuity in this country.”

In this bill, the death penalty can be invoked for cases involving “aggravated homosexuality”, which describes sex acts committed without consent or under duress, against children, people with mental or physical disabilities, by a “serial offender,” or involving incest.

This bill now heads to the table of yet another extremist, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, who earlier stated that homosexuals are “deviants.”

Sans any impactful efforts deal with what is happening in Uganda, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Volker Türk simply called on Uganda’s president not to sign the bill into law as it would mean lesbian, gay and bisexual people in Uganda will become criminals simply “for existing, for being who they are”. As such, Türk said, the legislation would lead to “systematic” human rights violations.

Outrage Magazine was in Kampala, Uganda in 2018 to interview local LGBTQIA leaders, who lamented that societal discrimination is worsened by laws that support the discrimination instead of the victims.

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