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LGBT-inclusive advertising helpful in driving business

Nearly two-thirds (65%) believe that LGBT-inclusive brands/businesses are good for the economy and almost similar (64%) believe that these initiatives reflect diversity. However – and perhaps worth stressing – majority (68%) report that in order to be an LGBT ally, brands/businesses need to “walk the talk” by following through on promises and plans.

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PHOTO TAKEN DURING METRO MANILA PRIDE 2017

Being pro-LGBT is good for business.

This, at least, can be surmised from an Ogilvy survey involving over 1,000 Americans, including over 400 LGBT allies, and which revealed that nearly two-thirds of the respondents (65%) believe that LGBT-inclusive brands/businesses are good for the economy and an almost similar number (64%) believe that these initiatives reflect diversity.

However – and perhaps worth stressing – majority (68%) report that in order to be an LGBT ally, brands/businesses need to “walk the talk” by following through on promises and plans.

“Our survey demonstrates that creating LGBT inclusive advertising should be more than just a diversity initiative. When it’s done right, it can be a way to drive value at a higher level for an entire business,” said Bill Berman, Ogilvy account director and co-chair of Ogilvy Pride.

The survey also found that LGBT-inclusive advertising can be a key business driver among consumers as 64% of LGBT allies and 46% of all those surveyed say that seeing a brands’ LGBT-inclusive advertising would make them more likely to consider purchasing its products/services.

Opposing inclusion can also impact purchasing decisions with 63% of LGBT allies and 48% of respondents reporting that they try to avoid buying products/services from a brand/business they know discriminates against the LGBT community.

Additional key findings:

  • Over seven in ten (72%) believe that a brand/business that is LGBT-inclusive is an ally of the LGBT community.
  • Over one-third (35%) report having LGBT-inclusive advertising is an indicator that a brand/business is LGBT-inclusive.
  • One in four (25%) report social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.) as a source that has provided them information about whether a brand/business is LGBT-inclusive.
  • Nearly three in four (73%) report it is important for brands/businesses to employ a diverse team of people to best serve customers.
  • Nearly six in 10 (57%) believe brands/businesses should hire diverse advertising professionals to create LGBT-inclusive advertisements.

Ogilvy fielded a seven-question survey of among 1,087 Americans (aged 18+), of whom 436 were considered LGBT Allies, to understand their perspectives about the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community as it relates to the brands (e.g., Walmart, Ford, Apple, Bank of America, etc.) and businesses (e.g., local coffee shops, restaurants, etc.) they interact with day-to-day.  The online survey was fielded by YouGov from May 18-19, 2017, and figures have been weighted and are representative of all US adults. The Ogilvy Pride internal organization created this survey.

 LGBT allies were defined as Americans who do not identify as LGBT, but have beliefs or have taken some action in support of the LGBT community (stopped purchasing from a non-supportive brand, donated to LGBT-related charities, have LGBT friends, etc.).

NEWSMAKERS

Tech-related jealousy is real… including LGBTQIAs

According to the Pew Research Center, about one-third of LGB partnered adults whose significant other uses social media report that they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media (versus 22% of straight people who say this).

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Photo by @nordwood from Unsplash.com

Social media can be a source of jealousy and uncertainty in relationships – especially for younger adults.

This is according to a Pew Research Center study (with the survey conducted in October 2019, though the study was only released recently) that found that, indeed, many people encounter tech-related struggles with their significant others.

In “Dating and Relationships in the Digital Age”, Pew Research Center noted that “younger people value social media as a place to share how much they care about their partner or to keep up with what’s going on in their partner’s life.” However, “they also acknowledge some of the downsides that these sites can have on relationships.”

Twenty-three percent (23%) of adults with partners who use social media say they have felt jealous or unsure about their relationship because of the way their current spouse or partner interacts with other people on social media.

Now get this: the number is higher among those in younger age groups.

Among partnered adults whose significant other uses social media, 34% of 18- to 29-year-olds and 26% of those ages 30 to 49 say they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media. This is definitely higher than the 19% of those aged 50 to 64 who say this, and 4% of those ages 65 and up.

The insecurity is also common among those not married – i.e. 37% of unmarried adults with partners who are social media users say they have felt this way about their current partner, while only 17% of married people say the same.

Women are reportedly more likely to express displeasure with how their significant other interacts with others on social media (29% vs. 17% for men).

Meanwhile, college graduates are less likely to report having felt this way than those with some college experience or a high school degree or less.

And yes, LGBTQIA community members are no different.

According to the Pew Research Center, about one-third of LGB partnered adults whose significant other uses social media report that they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media (versus 22% of straight people who say this).

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Health & Wellness

Binge drinkers beware, ‘Drunkorexia’ is calling

Excess alcohol consumption combined with restrictive and disordered eating patterns is extremely dangerous and can dramatically increase the risk of developing serious physical and psychological consequences, including hypoglycaemia, liver cirrhosis, nutritional deficits, brain and heart damage, memory lapses, blackouts, depression and cognitive deficits.

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Photo by andrew jay from Unsplash.com

Mojito, appletini or a simple glass of fizz – they may take the edge off a busy day, but if you find yourself bingeing on more than a few, you could be putting your physical and mental health at risk according new research at the University of South Australia.

Examining the drinking patterns of 479 female Australian university students aged 18-24 years, the world-first empirical study explored the underlying belief patterns than can contribute to “Drunkorexia” – a damaging and dangerous behavior where disordered patterns of eating are used to offset negative effects of consuming excess alcohol, such as gaining weight.

Concerningly, researchers found that a staggering 82.7 per cent of female university students surveyed had engaged in “Drunkorexic” behaviors over the past three months. And, more than 28 per cent were regularly and purposely skipping meals, consuming low-calorie or sugar-free alcoholic beverages, purging or exercising after drinking to help reduce ingested calories from alcohol, at least 25 per cent of the time.

Clinical psychologist and lead UniSA researcher Alycia Powell-Jones says the prevalence of Drunkorexic behaviours among Australian female university students is concerning.

“Due to their age and stage of development, young adults are more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors, which can include drinking excess alcohol,” Powell-Jones says. “Excess alcohol consumption combined with restrictive and disordered eating patterns is extremely dangerous and can dramatically increase the risk of developing serious physical and psychological consequences, including hypoglycaemia, liver cirrhosis, nutritional deficits, brain and heart damage, memory lapses, blackouts, depression and cognitive deficits.”

She added that “certainly, many of us have drunk too much alcohol at some point in time, and we know just by how we feel the next day, that this is not good for us, but when nearly a third of young female uni students are intentionally cutting back on food purely to offset alcohol calories; it’s a serious health concern.”

The harmful use of alcohol is a global issue, with excess consumption causing millions of deaths, including many thousands of young lives.

In Australia for instance, one in six people consume alcohol at dangerous levels, placing them at lifetime risk of an alcohol-related disease or injury. The combination of excessive alcohol intake with restrictive eating behaviors to offset calories can result in a highly toxic cocktail for this population.

The study was undertaken in two stages. The first measured the prevalence of self-reported, compensative and restrictive activities in relation to their alcohol consumption.

The second stage identified participants’ Early Maladaptive Schemes (EMS) – or thought patterns – finding that that the subset of schemas most predictive of Drunkorexia were ‘insufficient self-control’, ’emotional deprivation’ and ‘social isolation’.

Powell-Jones says identifying the early maladaptive schemas linked to Drunkorexia is key to understanding the harmful condition.

These are deeply held and pervasive themes regarding oneself and one’s relationship with others, that can develop in childhood and then can influence all areas of life, often in dysfunctional ways. Early maladaptive schemas can also be influenced by cultural and social norms.

Drunkorexic behaviour appears to be motivated by two key social norms for young adults – consuming alcohol and thinness.

“This study has provided preliminary insight into better understanding why young female adults make these decisions to engage in ‘Drunkorexic’ behaviors,” Powell-Jones says. “Not only may it be a coping strategy to manage social anxieties through becoming accepted and fitting in with peer group or cultural expectations, but it also shows a reliance on avoidant coping strategies.”

It is recommended for clinicians, educators, parents and friends to be aware of the factors that motivate young women to engage in this harmful and dangerous behavior, including cultural norms, beliefs that drive self-worth, a sense of belonging, and interpersonal connectedness.

“By being connected, researchers and clinicians can develop appropriate clinical interventions and support for vulnerable young people within the youth mental health sector,” Powell-Jones says.

Worth highlighting: Alcoholism is a big issue in the LGBTQIA community.

A 2017 study found that bisexual people had higher odds of engaging in alcohol use behaviors when compared with people from the sexual majority. This study also found that bullying mediated sexual minority status and alcohol use more particularly among bisexual females.

Still in 2017, another study noted higher levels of alcohol use among men who have sex with men (MSM), which is closely associated with intimate partner violence (IPV). The same study found that over half of MSM experienced IPV, and just under half of MSM perpetrating IPV themselves, including physical, sexual, emotional or HIV-related IPV.

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Travel

A first for Central America, Costa Rica legalizes marriage equality

Costa Rica is now the 28th UN member state to recognize marriage equality.

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Photo by Jose Pablo Garcia from Unsplash.com

#Loveislove

Costa Rica has formally – and finally – legalized marriage equality, after a landmark court ruling came into effect.

In 2018, Costa Rica’s constitutional court ruled that a ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional and discriminatory. The country’s parliament was given 18 months to legislate on this, or else the ban will be automatically overruled.

May 25, Monday, marked that deadline.

In a tweet following this, Costa Rica’s President Carlos Alvarado Quesada said: “Empathy and love should from now on be the guiding principles which will allow us to move forward.”

Quesada took office in May 2018, and his campaign promised to legalize marriage equality.

Costa Rica is now the 28th UN member state to recognize marriage equality.

Also in a tweet, Victor Madrigal-Borloz, the U.N. Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity — who is also from Costa Rica — said that this is “an extraordinary moment of celebration and gratitude to the work of so many activists, and of quiet reflection of the loves of those who lived without seeing this moment.”

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Health & Wellness

Greater availability of non-alcoholic drinks may reduce alcohol consumption

The findings suggest that interventions to encourage healthier food and drink choices may be most effective when changing the relative availability of healthier and less-healthy options.

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People are more likely to opt for non-alcoholic drinks if there are more of them available than alcoholic drinks, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

A team of researchers at the NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, and the Universities of Bristol and Cambridge, UK found that when presented with eight drink options, participants were 48% more likely to choose a non-alcoholic drink when the proportion of non-alcoholic drink options increased from four (50%) to six (75%). When the proportion of non-alcoholic drink options decreased from four to two (25%), participants were 46% less likely to choose a non-alcoholic drink.

Dr Anna Blackwell, the corresponding author said: “Alcohol consumption is among the top five risk factors for disease globally. Previous research has shown that increasing the availability of healthier food options can increase their selection and consumption relative to less healthy food. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that increasing the availability of non-alcoholic drinks, relative to alcoholic drinks in an online scenario, can increase their selection.”

Participants in the study completed an online task in which they were presented with a selection of alcoholic beer, non-alcoholic beer and soft-drinks. The drink selections included four alcoholic and four non-alcoholic drinks, six alcoholic and two non-alcoholic drinks or two alcoholic and six non-alcoholic drinks. 808 UK residents with an average age of 38 years who regularly consumed alcohol participated in the study.

When presented with mostly non-alcoholic drinks, 49% of participants selected a non-alcoholic drink, compared to 26% of participants who selected a non-alcoholic drink when presented with mostly alcoholic drinks. These results were consistent regardless of the time participants had to make their decision, indicating that the findings were not dependent on the amount of time and attention participants were able to devote to their drink choice. The findings suggest that interventions to encourage healthier food and drink choices may be most effective when changing the relative availability of healthier and less-healthy options.

Anna Blackwell said: “Many licensed venues already offer several non-alcoholic options but these are often stored out of direct sight, for example in low-level fridges behind the bar. Our results indicate that making these non-alcoholic products more visible to customers may influence them to make healthier choices. The market for alcohol-free beer, wine and spirit alternatives is small but growing and improving the selection and promotion of non-alcoholic drinks in this way could provide an opportunity for licensed venues to reduce alcohol consumption without losing revenue.”

The authors caution that as the study measured hypothetical drink selection online, results may differ in real-world settings. Further studies are needed to determine how the relative availability of non-alcoholic and alcoholic drinks impacts the purchasing and consumption of alcohol in real life.

Alcoholism is a big issue in the LGBTQIA community.

In 2017, a study found that bisexual people had higher odds of engaging in alcohol use behaviors when compared with people from the sexual majority. This study also found that bullying mediated sexual minority status and alcohol use more particularly among bisexual females.

Still in 2017, another study noted higher levels of alcohol use among men who have sex with men (MSM), which is closely associated with intimate partner violence (IPV). The same study found that over half of MSM experienced IPV, and just under half of MSM perpetrating IPV themselves, including physical, sexual, emotional or HIV-related IPV.

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Travel

Calgary officially bans ‘conversion therapy’

The so-called “conversion therapy” is now illegal in Calgary in Canada, with the city council voting 14-1 to approve a bylaw that bans the practice. Businesses that break the law by offering the practice for a fee will face fines up to $10,000.

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Photo by Blake Guidry from Unsplash.com

Rainbow rising in Canada.

The so-called “conversion therapy” is now illegal in Calgary in Canada, with the city council voting 14-1 to approve a bylaw that bans the practice. Businesses that break the law by offering the practice for a fee will face fines up to $10,000.

“Conversion therapy” is the most widely-used term used to describe practices attempting to change, suppress or divert one’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. It is also called reorientation therapy, reparative therapy, reintegrative therapy, or, more recently, support for unwanted same-sex attraction or transgender identities.

Medical associations are critical of this practice – e.g. the World Psychiatric Association criticized these as “wholly unethical,” and the Pan American Health Organization warned that they pose “a serious threat to the health and well-being of affected people.” The Canadian Psychological Association and the World Health Organization also oppose the same, stating that it poses a “severe threat to the health and human rights of the affected persons.”

Other countries already deal with this, including Malta, Ecuador, Germany, Brazil and Taiwan. Still other countries are in the process of banning the practice, including Australia, Canada, Chile, France, Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, and the US.

With this development, Mayor Naheed Nenshi was quoted as saying: “There are forces of anger and hatred that our gender and sexually diverse brothers and sisters have to deal with every single day. Sometimes in this job, sometimes we get to just do what’s right.”

Approximately 47,000 LGBTQIA Canadians underwent some form of “conversion therapy”, according to a Community Based Research Centre study.

To date, five Canadian provinces and eight other Alberta municipalities have taken steps to ban the practice. A federal ban is also in the works.

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Lifestyle & Culture

CBD weed – It’s real, so get the facts

But what really is CBD weed, and why all the fuss? Let’s find out.

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As the legal use of marijuana grows, people are getting more interested in weed and curious about all the options given to them by this miraculous plant. Until now, we’ve discovered two natural extracts – THC and CBD. The first one has been known, and used for many years, the other one not so much. But can the CBD weed become the next big thing? 

Many people are starting to believe that it indeed can. As its popularity grows, more and more weed shops like 420DC are widening their range of CBD based products. What’s more, it is also getting more attention from the medical world. 

But what really is CBD weed, and why all the fuss? Let’s find out.

What is CBD?

Let’s start with a quick chemistry lesson. Cannabidiol, better known as CBD, is the marijuana or hemp plant natural extract. What’s a hemp plant? It is a cannabis plant that contains less than 0.3 percent of THC. What does it mean? It means that it won’t get you high because THC is the main psychoactive compound. The less THC, the less high sensations. So if you want to get high, don’t use CBD weed, use THC weed.

Okay, now you know what CBD weed is, now’s the time to find out how it works. The main difference between THC and CBD is that CBD is known as the non-psychoactive one. It’s not entirely correct to say that about CBD weed. Even though it doesn’t give you the same high sensations as THC, it does directly affect your mood and process of cognition.

However, CBD is not intoxicating. It has the calming effect associated with cannabis but doesn’t affect you as the THC does. THC often leaves its users intoxicated and temporarily impaired, whereas CBD does none of these things. That’s why CBD weed is called the non-psychoactive one.

Medical benefits

Cannabis has gotten more attention from the medical world in recent years. Both THC and CBD are well known for their medical benefits and can be used in different types of diseases. Because of its non-psychoactive effect, CBD can be used by patients who have psychosis and mental disorders, inflammation, epilepsy, seizures, nausea, and migraines. So CBD for the people, right?

CBD weed is also much more tolerated by our organism, even in large doses. Any side effects that may occur by its usage are often caused by the other medications that are taken with it and not by the CBD itself. It’s a huge advantage of CBD when you compare it to THC. 

Now a little piece of evidence to resolve your doubts. In the study published by The Permanente Journal on the 7th of January in 2019, it turned out that CBD weed can have a great impact on people suffering from anxiety and insomnia. The study found that 600 milligrams of CBD decreased anxiety in people before their public speeches. There’s more. 25 milligrams of CBD daily for a month made people who used it more relaxed, and it also increased their quality of sleep. CBD for the people indeed.

But CBD can also be used by pets, or to be more precise, by the owners on their pets. It is scientifically proven that CBD helps in curing seizures, arthritis, and other issues found in dogs. It can also help your dog to calm down when it’s stressed and frightening. More research is needed, but CBD can really be a great thing for your cat or dog.

Legality

Hemp-derived CBD products are legal under federal law thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill, but some states and cities have a more strict policy when it comes to CBD weed. CBD products are also forbidden on domestic and international flights. 

In recent years DEA has loosened its policy when it comes to CBD based products such as CBD oil made of hemp, but overall CBD is still in a legal grey area. Food and Administration, for example, is yet to legalize CBD for sale as a supplement, and it’s waiting for more information on the CBD itself. Unfortunately, there are no CBD books, but many scientists are working to find more information about CBD weed.

Despite FAD concerns and legal constraints, CBD weed is getting more and more attention and interest, as the hype around it increases. CBD is finding its way into a lot of common products. There are CBD chocolates, CBD bath bombs, CBD shakes, coffee, and many more. Who knows, maybe even Willy Wonka had a CBD chocolate somewhere in his factory. That would’ve explained a lot.

Usage

It’s high time for the most exciting part of the article, more particularly, the usage. CBD weed can be used in many different ways, mostly because the market offers a vast range of other CBD based products. As mentioned before, even common products can be based on miraculous cannabis extract.

Firstly, we have an edible CBD. You will be able to find tons of so-called non-psychoactive CBD products on the Internet. Because it is something you eat, edible CBD covers what you ingest, and when it lands in your stomach, it intestines and gets soaked into your bloodstream. You will feel the effects after 45 minutes to 2 hours, depending on what and how much of it you eat. CBD can be found in chocolates and other sweets, beverages, and capsules.

The second way of getting CBD into your system is by inhaling it. A traditional method known for centuries is also reliable when it comes to CBD weed. By getting straight into your lungs, CBD will find multiple ways to creep in, and thanks to a vape heating cannabis extract, it will provide you with a potent and fast-acting effect. There are a lot of CBD vape pens all around the Internet, so it won’t be hard for you to find the best CBD pen to suit your needs.

There’s also an external way of CBD usage. Cannabinoid receptors are not only present inside of you, but they can also be found on your whole skin. Thanks to that, there are plenty of CBD based skincare products in the market. CBD soaps, creams, oils, ointments, etc. can have an excellent effect on people with skin problems, acne, or psoriasis. Thick lotions are more useful when it comes to pain, whereas light creams can be great for facial skin.

Types of CBD oil

If you want to start taking CBD, the best way to begin is with oil since it’s very easy to use. You can add it to your food or drink, use it in your CBD pen, or put a few drops under your tongue. But before you buy yourself one, remember that there are three major types of CBD oil. 

The first one is full-spectrum CBD oil. It contains, in addition to the full spectrum of CBD, a trace amount of THC that can be found in the hemp plant. 

The second one is called broad-spectrum. It contains a full spectrum of cannabinoids and other terpenes, but there are no traces of THC.

The last type of CBD oil is an isolate. It contains only CBD, and other cannabis compounds are nowhere to be found.

As you can see, it’s very easy to find yourself an oil that will suit all your needs, but you should be aware of the fact that not all CBD oils and products are created equal. There are of course companies that respect consumers and therefore adhere to labeling standards, but there are also ones that would love to deceive you. Look out for vague labels that say hemp oil or hemp seed oil, because usually they don’t have anything to do with CBD.

Summary

Alright, now it’s time to sum it all up. After reading this article, you should know that CBD stands for cannabidiol and that there are many reasons why it’s getting more attention. Even though in-depth research on CBD effects on our life and health, there are many people claiming that it has indeed helped them with overcoming various health and mental problems. Should we expect the growth of CBD based products, and medicaments in the future though? The answer will reveal itself in the next few years, but all the fuss is not a coincidence. Nevertheless, we must still wait to start producing t-shirts with “CBD for life” phrases on them.

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