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MiniStation Air: Wireless streaming storage

Buffalo’s MiniStation Air solves the problem of limited storage capacity on Smart Phones and Tablets by making it possible to wirelessly read and even write files on smart phones and tablets.

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MiniStation AirBuffalo’s MiniStation Air brings you the solution for the limited storage capacity on Smart Phones and Tablets. The MiniStation Air makes it possible to wirelessly read and even write files on smart phones and tablets.

Upload your data such as photos and video on the portable Ministation Air while on the move. For transferring large amounts of data from desktop PC’s or laptops you can use the fast USB3.0 interface (up to 5Gb/s). The amount of data is no longer a problem, wherever you go it’s always available.

It’s even possible to stream media to three WiFi enabled devices at the same time. This allows you to share files to streaming clients. Thanks to the integrated WiFi, superspeed USB (USB3.0) and a capacity of 500GB you have all your data with you, wherever you go. The battery is easily charged with AC adapter or via USB on the PC and has up to 4 hours battery life.

The WiFi setup connection is easily done with WPS or AOSS. MiniStation Air is capable of WPA2 wireless encryption for secure data transfer.

Key features include: read and write files on Smart devices such as iPhones, iPads and more; allow Internet access during WiFi connection by using “Internet mode”; battery charge anywhere with AC adapter or USB on PC (four hours); wireless and superspeed USB 3.0 dual interface; easy WiFi setup connection with WPS and AOSS; wireless connection with high security encryption (WPA2); and the max simultaneous connection of three connections (recommended).

Buffalo MiniStation Air is distributed in the Philippines by MSI-ECS. For availability, pricing and complete specs, email marketing@msi-ecs.com.ph.

Health & Wellness

Bullying is common factor in LGBTQ youth suicides, Yale study finds

Death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers.

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Researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found that death records of LGBTQ youth who died by suicide were substantially more likely to mention bullying as a factor than their non-LGBTQ peers. The researchers reviewed nearly 10,000 death records of youth ages 10 to 19 who died by suicide in the United States from 2003 to 2017.

The findings are published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

While LGBTQ youth are more likely to be bullied and to report suicidal thoughts and behaviors than non-LGBTQ youth, this is believed to be the first study showing that bullying is a more common precursor to suicide among LGBTQ youth than among their peers.

“We expected that bullying might be a more common factor, but we were surprised by the size of the disparity,” said lead author Kirsty Clark, a postdoctoral fellow at Yale School of Public Health. “These findings strongly suggest that additional steps need to be taken to protect LGBTQ youth — and others — against the insidious threat of bullying.”

Death records from LGBTQ youths were about five times more likely to mention bullying than non-LGBTQ youths’ death records, the study found. Among 10- to 13-year-olds, over two-thirds of LGBTQ youths’ death records mentioned that they had been bullied.

Bullying is a major public health problem among youth, and it is especially pronounced among LGBTQ youth, said the researchers. Clark and her co-authors used data from the National Violent Death Reporting System, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-led database that collects information on violent deaths, including suicides, from death certificates, law enforcement reports, and medical examiner and coroner records.

Death records in the database include narrative summaries from law enforcement reports and medical examiner and coroner records regarding the details of the youth’s suicide as reported by family or friends, the youth’s diary, social media posts, and text or email messages, as well as any suicide note. Clark and her team searched these narratives for words and phrases that suggested whether the individual was LGBTQ. They followed a similar process to identify death records mentioning bullying.

“Bullies attack the core foundation of adolescent well-being,” said John Pachankis, the Susan Dwight Bliss Associate Professor of Public Health at the Yale School of Public Health and study co-author. “By showing that bullying is also associated with life itself for LGBTQ youth, this study urgently calls for interventions that foster safety, belonging and esteem for all young people.”

Other authors on the study include Anthony J. Maiolatesi, doctoral student at Yale School of Public Health, and Susan Cochran, professor at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

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NEWSMAKERS

Tech-related jealousy is real… including LGBTQIAs

According to the Pew Research Center, about one-third of LGB partnered adults whose significant other uses social media report that they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media (versus 22% of straight people who say this).

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Social media can be a source of jealousy and uncertainty in relationships – especially for younger adults.

This is according to a Pew Research Center study (with the survey conducted in October 2019, though the study was only released recently) that found that, indeed, many people encounter tech-related struggles with their significant others.

In “Dating and Relationships in the Digital Age”, Pew Research Center noted that “younger people value social media as a place to share how much they care about their partner or to keep up with what’s going on in their partner’s life.” However, “they also acknowledge some of the downsides that these sites can have on relationships.”

Twenty-three percent (23%) of adults with partners who use social media say they have felt jealous or unsure about their relationship because of the way their current spouse or partner interacts with other people on social media.

Now get this: the number is higher among those in younger age groups.

Among partnered adults whose significant other uses social media, 34% of 18- to 29-year-olds and 26% of those ages 30 to 49 say they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media. This is definitely higher than the 19% of those aged 50 to 64 who say this, and 4% of those ages 65 and up.

The insecurity is also common among those not married – i.e. 37% of unmarried adults with partners who are social media users say they have felt this way about their current partner, while only 17% of married people say the same.

Women are reportedly more likely to express displeasure with how their significant other interacts with others on social media (29% vs. 17% for men).

Meanwhile, college graduates are less likely to report having felt this way than those with some college experience or a high school degree or less.

And yes, LGBTQIA community members are no different.

According to the Pew Research Center, about one-third of LGB partnered adults whose significant other uses social media report that they have felt jealous or unsure in their current relationship because of how their partner interacted with others on social media (versus 22% of straight people who say this).

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Lifestyle & Culture

Does cannabis make you poo?

So, what exactly is going on, and how does cannabis affect the human stomach, and our need to do number 2?

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Besides calming, generally fun and beneficial effects it has on our nervous system, it seems that cannabis also affects our gastrointestinal system. And no, we’re not talking about munchies. 

If you ever felt the effects of cannabis on your gastrointestinal system, then you know we’re talking about running to the bathroom to make number two. And in case you were wondering, you’re not alone, because more than a few fellow herbal enthusiasts reported the very same thing. Apparently, weed interacts with our stomach and makes us poo.  

Now, to avoid presenting you with anecdotal evidence, we had to read through several studies regarding the effects that cannabis has on our gastrointestinal system. And according to a study published by The American Journal of Gastroenterology, any recent use of marijuana decreases the odd of constipation. However, this effect is counter to the already known physiological effect cannabis has on colonic motility.

So, what exactly is going on, and how does cannabis affect the human stomach, and our need to do number 2?

Puff-puff, poop-poop

To approach this topic properly and explain how cannabis makes us poop, first, we must understand how stress affects our brain, and our GI tract. 

From an evolutionary standpoint, it would be really impractical to defecate while you’re being chased or attacked by a predator. Our automatic nervous system unconsciously regulates our heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, sexual arousal, and urination and defecation. It’s a primary mechanism in control of fight-or-flight response. 

Whenever you find yourself in a dangerous situation, your sympathetic nervous system activates the physiological changes that occur dung fight-or-flight. It releases adrenaline or noradrenaline, and prepares the body for violent muscular action, like fighting, or running for your life. Among its many physiological effects, the release of adrenaline or noradrenaline slows down your stomach and digestion or stops it completely.

In contrast, the parasympathetic nervous system activates the “rest and digest” response, once the danger has passed, and returns the body to normal after the fight-or-flight response. Of course, it relaxes all the necessary muscles, regulates your heartbeat and breathing, and kickstarts your digestion. But what does cannabis have to do with all of this?

Well, if you’re under stress, your nervous system might perceive that as a threat, at least to some degree. Unfortunately, many people take their work-related stress home with them, still thinking and stressing around work, which can definitely affect bowel movement. So, when the times come for you to empty your bowels, you might be too stressed to do so without even realizing it.

We need a relaxed and comfortable place to be able to defecate, but our minds need to be relaxed and comfortable too. And that’s where weed kick’s in. Its calming properties can suppress the excessive sympathetic activity caused by stress, allowing your body to shift into “rest and digest” and do the deed.

But does it really work?

It does. A study from 2016 concluded that our endocannabinoid system plays an important role in regulating gastrointestinal motility. In other words, it can help regulate bowel movement. 

Until recently, clinical evidence suggested that cannabinoids slow colonic transit. However, according to the study published by the AJG, cannabinoids from the marijuana plant have unique effects on bowel movement. The study concluded that, despite slowing down colonic transit, cannabinoids reduce the odds of constipation by 30%. 

In truth, many weed enthusiasts noted more effortless bowel movement after indulging in some cannabis. Still, there are two sides of that particular coin. If you suffer from pain or anxiety-related constipation, cannabis can help alleviate the symptoms and allow you to go more comfortably.

But weed can also worsen the situation if you’re not constipated due to stress or pain because it suppresses muscular contractions and secretion in the colon. This, in turn, slows down colon transit, making it harder to defecate, but helps with diarrhea.

These studies provided groundbreaking insights that can help with many other issues like irritable bowel syndrome or clinical endocannabinoid deficiency. Still, further studies are needed to identify how to utilize cannabis for alleviating constipation clinically. You can follow the news on websites like Leafly or MedSignals.

Conclusion

In conclusion, cannabis can make you poo, if you’re suffering from stress-related constipation. So, the next time your poop train refuses to leave the station, relax and spark up a doobie. Not only can it help you make dookie, but it can slow your poop train down if it starts running wild and free. 

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Lifestyle & Culture

4 Signs you suffer from anxiety and how to treat it

Here is a list of the symptoms to watch out for and how to get relief.

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Did you know that anxiety disorders are the most common types of mental illnesses in the United States of America? In fact, it is estimated that approximately two in every ten adults are affected. If you think that you might be one of them, you are probably wondering what your treatment options are.

Here is a list of the symptoms to watch out for and how to get relief. 

You struggle with insomnia 

Anxiety and stress lead to the release of strong stress hormones that can drastically impact your ability to both fall asleep and stay asleep. This insomnia often sets off a vicious cycle of fatigue throughout the day combined with dreading going to bed at night, which only exacerbates your worries. 

You constantly feel nervous 

Most people diagnosed with anxiety report feeling consistently nervous, ‘on edge,’ or restless. These feelings are not always associated with events but become a part of daily life regardless of what they are doing or where they are going. 

You notice a wide array of physical symptoms 

Along with feeling jittery and nervous, you might also notice a few physical manifestations of anxiety. For example, many anxiety sufferers will experience an increased heart rate, shortness of breath, profuse sweating, shaking hands, weakness, and certain stomach problems. 

You cannot rationalize with yourself 

Have you noticed that no matter how much you try to tell yourself that you are overreacting or to remind yourself that everything is going to be fine, your symptoms still do not dissipate? This is a sure-fire sign that anxiety is present. Anxiety is not rational, and it can be challenging to control it without outside help.

Treatment options for anxiety 

There is no doubt that one of the most effective solutions for the treatment of anxiety is CBD or hemp oil. The relief brought about through the ingestion or inhalation of CBD or hemp oil is due to the powerful natural agents working wonders on re-balancing your brain chemistry. There are both animal and human studies that corroborate these benefits, so it is definitely worth giving it a try to see if it helps you. Luckily, it is very easy to buy ready-made CBD/hemp oil (although costly) or to buy bulk hemp seeds and start growing the plants yourself at home. 

Other treatment options to consider for anxiety relief include meditation, finding a proper outlet for stress, cognitive behavioral therapy, exposure therapy, and hypnosis. Many of these therapies are about trial and error, so be sure to try them all to find out which one works best for you. 

In some cases, simply talking to a therapist or a psychologist can help you to learn productive coping strategies for getting your feelings of anxiety under control. 

Once you are aware that your anxiety is playing a key role in your life and influencing you negatively, you can proceed to take action. Here’s hoping that you will find a worthwhile source of relief sooner rather than later.

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Health & Wellness

Binge drinkers beware, ‘Drunkorexia’ is calling

Excess alcohol consumption combined with restrictive and disordered eating patterns is extremely dangerous and can dramatically increase the risk of developing serious physical and psychological consequences, including hypoglycaemia, liver cirrhosis, nutritional deficits, brain and heart damage, memory lapses, blackouts, depression and cognitive deficits.

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Mojito, appletini or a simple glass of fizz – they may take the edge off a busy day, but if you find yourself bingeing on more than a few, you could be putting your physical and mental health at risk according new research at the University of South Australia.

Examining the drinking patterns of 479 female Australian university students aged 18-24 years, the world-first empirical study explored the underlying belief patterns than can contribute to “Drunkorexia” – a damaging and dangerous behavior where disordered patterns of eating are used to offset negative effects of consuming excess alcohol, such as gaining weight.

Concerningly, researchers found that a staggering 82.7 per cent of female university students surveyed had engaged in “Drunkorexic” behaviors over the past three months. And, more than 28 per cent were regularly and purposely skipping meals, consuming low-calorie or sugar-free alcoholic beverages, purging or exercising after drinking to help reduce ingested calories from alcohol, at least 25 per cent of the time.

Clinical psychologist and lead UniSA researcher Alycia Powell-Jones says the prevalence of Drunkorexic behaviours among Australian female university students is concerning.

“Due to their age and stage of development, young adults are more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors, which can include drinking excess alcohol,” Powell-Jones says. “Excess alcohol consumption combined with restrictive and disordered eating patterns is extremely dangerous and can dramatically increase the risk of developing serious physical and psychological consequences, including hypoglycaemia, liver cirrhosis, nutritional deficits, brain and heart damage, memory lapses, blackouts, depression and cognitive deficits.”

She added that “certainly, many of us have drunk too much alcohol at some point in time, and we know just by how we feel the next day, that this is not good for us, but when nearly a third of young female uni students are intentionally cutting back on food purely to offset alcohol calories; it’s a serious health concern.”

The harmful use of alcohol is a global issue, with excess consumption causing millions of deaths, including many thousands of young lives.

In Australia for instance, one in six people consume alcohol at dangerous levels, placing them at lifetime risk of an alcohol-related disease or injury. The combination of excessive alcohol intake with restrictive eating behaviors to offset calories can result in a highly toxic cocktail for this population.

The study was undertaken in two stages. The first measured the prevalence of self-reported, compensative and restrictive activities in relation to their alcohol consumption.

The second stage identified participants’ Early Maladaptive Schemes (EMS) – or thought patterns – finding that that the subset of schemas most predictive of Drunkorexia were ‘insufficient self-control’, ’emotional deprivation’ and ‘social isolation’.

Powell-Jones says identifying the early maladaptive schemas linked to Drunkorexia is key to understanding the harmful condition.

These are deeply held and pervasive themes regarding oneself and one’s relationship with others, that can develop in childhood and then can influence all areas of life, often in dysfunctional ways. Early maladaptive schemas can also be influenced by cultural and social norms.

Drunkorexic behaviour appears to be motivated by two key social norms for young adults – consuming alcohol and thinness.

“This study has provided preliminary insight into better understanding why young female adults make these decisions to engage in ‘Drunkorexic’ behaviors,” Powell-Jones says. “Not only may it be a coping strategy to manage social anxieties through becoming accepted and fitting in with peer group or cultural expectations, but it also shows a reliance on avoidant coping strategies.”

It is recommended for clinicians, educators, parents and friends to be aware of the factors that motivate young women to engage in this harmful and dangerous behavior, including cultural norms, beliefs that drive self-worth, a sense of belonging, and interpersonal connectedness.

“By being connected, researchers and clinicians can develop appropriate clinical interventions and support for vulnerable young people within the youth mental health sector,” Powell-Jones says.

Worth highlighting: Alcoholism is a big issue in the LGBTQIA community.

A 2017 study found that bisexual people had higher odds of engaging in alcohol use behaviors when compared with people from the sexual majority. This study also found that bullying mediated sexual minority status and alcohol use more particularly among bisexual females.

Still in 2017, another study noted higher levels of alcohol use among men who have sex with men (MSM), which is closely associated with intimate partner violence (IPV). The same study found that over half of MSM experienced IPV, and just under half of MSM perpetrating IPV themselves, including physical, sexual, emotional or HIV-related IPV.

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Travel

A first for Central America, Costa Rica legalizes marriage equality

Costa Rica is now the 28th UN member state to recognize marriage equality.

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Photo by Jose Pablo Garcia from Unsplash.com

#Loveislove

Costa Rica has formally – and finally – legalized marriage equality, after a landmark court ruling came into effect.

In 2018, Costa Rica’s constitutional court ruled that a ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional and discriminatory. The country’s parliament was given 18 months to legislate on this, or else the ban will be automatically overruled.

May 25, Monday, marked that deadline.

In a tweet following this, Costa Rica’s President Carlos Alvarado Quesada said: “Empathy and love should from now on be the guiding principles which will allow us to move forward.”

Quesada took office in May 2018, and his campaign promised to legalize marriage equality.

https://twitter.com/CarlosAlvQ/status/1265160738936631296?s=20

Costa Rica is now the 28th UN member state to recognize marriage equality.

Also in a tweet, Victor Madrigal-Borloz, the U.N. Independent Expert on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity — who is also from Costa Rica — said that this is “an extraordinary moment of celebration and gratitude to the work of so many activists, and of quiet reflection of the loves of those who lived without seeing this moment.”

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