Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Travel

France removes restrictions on gay, bisexual blood donors

France will allow LGBTQIA citizens – particularly gay and bisexual men – to donate blood without “discriminatory” conditions starting March 16.

Photo by Dwain Norsa from Unsplash.com

France will allow LGBTQIA citizens – particularly gay and bisexual men – to donate blood without “discriminatory” conditions starting March 16. This was announced by the country’s health minister, Olivier Véran, who stated that the country is “putting an end to an inequality that was no longer justified.”

With this, references to sexual orientation will be removed from blood donor forms; and so any person will arrive as an individual donor.

In July 2016, the country actually loosened its anti-LGBTQIA policy, allowing LGBTQIA blood donors to donate blood as long as they had not been sexually active for one year. The time period was later reduced to four months in 2019.

As in many countries, the ban particularly on gay and bisexual men giving blood in France was initially put in place in 1983 due to the risk of the transmission of HIV.

With the change in policy, nonetheless, French citizens will still be asked if they have had treatment for HIV in the four months before giving blood. They will similarly be asked about their recent sexual activity or drug use.

Other European countries, including Spain, Italy, and the UK, already lifted bans on gay and bisexual men donating blood.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Like Us On Facebook

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Travel

A bill was signed by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to protect LGBTQIA students – particularly transgender and gay students – from being outed to...

Travel

In Japan, a high court ruled that a transgender woman should be able to change the sex assigned to them at birth in their...

Travel

In Texas in the US, the state’s Supreme Court allowed the ban on gender-affirming care for transgender minors to remain in effect while a...

Travel

With the new law, married LGBTQIA people will have hospital visiting rights, and receive tax and social security benefits.

Advertisement