Connect with us

People You Should Know

The trials and tribulations of Mr. Gay World Philippines 2018

The Philippines’ hope of winning back-to-back Mr. Gay World titles rests on the shoulders of Gleeko Magpoc, an independent delegate, married to an Indian national and currently based in Sweden. If he survived the cyber bashing of his nonbelievers, could he also withstand the rigors of the competition in South Africa and duplicate John Raspado’s feat?

Published

on

Only two countries achieved a back-to-back victory in Mr. Gay World pageant’s entire history: South Africa’s Charl van den Berg (2010) and Francois Nel (2011), as well as Andreas Derleth (2012) and Christopher Olwage (2013) of New Zealand. But these records might change soon, should lady luck smile on our very own Gleeko Esguerra Magpoc.

If his name doesn’t ring a bell among Filipino pageant aficionados, that’s because Magpoc was never a candidate of past Mr. Gay World Philippines editions. He volunteered to wear the country’s satin sash in this international contest established by Australia-based philanthropist Eric Butter. Now on its 10th year, Mr. Gay World “strives to be a mentor in grooming gay leaders that will advance LGBT human rights” in their respective nations and across the globe.

No local search or casting call was conducted this year as Wilbert Tolentino, Mr. Gay World Philippines of 2009, decided to let go the country’s exclusive license of Mr. Gay World in July last year. Under Tolentino’s helm, Christian Reyes Lacsamana became the first Filipino delegate to enter the top five round and emerged second runner-up to Roger Gosalbez Pitaluga of Spain in 2016; while John Fernandez Raspado became the country’s first-ever Mr. Gay World, and the first Asian to win the title.

“I learned that the Philippines didn’t have any representative, so I contacted the admin [of Mr. Gay World Ltd.] and followed the procedures. I thought of representing my country to continue supporting the LGBT community,” Magpoc said, in an online interview with Outrage Magazine before he left for South Africa for his much-awaited global mission. “This is my first pageant… I want to continue spreading awareness to show that we are here to support those who feel depressed and oppressed.” He is a 28-year-old restaurant service crew who migrated to Stockholm, Sweden after getting married to Amitabh Das, an Indian national, back in October 2015.

He is hoping that lightning will strike twice because Raspado conquered Spain last year. But tons of his kababayans in Manila believe otherwise: Gleeko Magpoc would probably go down in the annals of the pageant history as the most bashed Filipino candidate in Mr. Gay World.

FACING BASHING

As soon as his photos and profile video on You Tube were uploaded in the “Delegates 2018” subsection of Mr. Gay World’s official website, and after Tolentino made a public post via Facebook, reiterating his resignation as the country director and license holder of Mr. Gay World, saying “that the current representative volunteered to compete. He was not appointed and never involved with the MGWPO. He has never undergone pageant training with us. He was never connected with the organization or with me personally. The Mr. Gay World itself accepted him with open arms and we need to respect them. I hope I have answered all your queries,” Magpoc’s online ordeal began.

A multitude of Facebook users flooded the comments section of Tolentino’s post, expressing their disappointment with the Mr. Gay World Ltd., questioning Magpoc’s qualifications, suggesting that Mr. Gay World Philippines 2016 first runner-up Bench Ortiz should be the one sent to South Africa, etc. The cyber mob and the day-to-day bullying that remains under-reported, has reached pageant-related Facebook groups as of this writing.

Raspado already stepped up on cyberspace to defend Magpoc: “I admire this person, because he took responsibility when nobody else can… he qualified as an independent… and I feel for this person because of all the bashing and critics, same critics I received when I was still starting. He faces a big struggle ahead, but let us by any means support him… as a Filipino and as an LGBT advocate.”

READ:  Open Table MCC: Celebrating beautiful diversity

Igor Scheurkogel, Mr. Gay World chairman of the board of directors, reaffirmed their stand that they made the decision to include Magpoc in this year’s lineup of candidates since there was no national competition held in the Philippines this year. “And after multiple and extensive outreach (sic) to the old directors of MGWPH to indicate a candidate or any leads, we had no options. [And] because I’m not from the Philippines I do not have the networks to select a person. [And] therefore, if there is a person willing to represent and paid all the license fees and other costs, we [as Mr. Gay World Organization], are willing to work with the person. Also, if a person is willing to represent our LGBT community, we all should consider that he possibly has a good motive and doesn’t need a lot of pageant ‘training’. For now, it’s up to the Philippines to support the delegate and show national pride. If he wins, he would need support.”

GETTING TO KNOW GLEEKO  

But Magpoc is someone who chooses to let things bother him. “They are not so destructive,” he laughed. “I’m aware of some [criticisms], but not all. I don’t have time to read so many things which I personally believe are not worthy… Bashers are everywhere no matter who you are. You just have to accept the reality and then move on. I learned from Buddhism to let go.”

He added that “Mr. Gay World is not a beauty pageant. The main reason why it is held annually since its inception in 2009 is to identify leaders who will be speaking out for equal and human rights in a global stage. The acceptance of LGBTQI+ identities is one of its missions.”

Born on August 5, 1999 in Manila, Gleeko is the fourth among the five children of Celso de Guzman Magpoc Jr., a native of Bataan, and the former Charibell Gaon who hails from Pasay City. Both of his parents already passed away.

“I am not so sure about the origin of my name, but according to my mother she just changed the spelling [of Glico to Gleeko], whom she said is a friend of my father. However, I learned that glico in Greek means ‘sugar’ [which happened to be sweet],” he said.

He’s an undergraduate of Japanese studies program at the University of Manila. “For almost nine years, I have worked as a bilingual call center agent [Spanish/English] in the Philippines. “I easily learn languages… I love to learn languages. I tried learning Russian and recently, I started learning Arabic. I also love swimming. It’s my form of exercise and relaxation.”

To prepare, he studied YouTube videos of previous Mr. Gay World pageants. “I would love to meet him [John Raspado] in Knysna. He is [of course] an epitome of the LGBTQI+ community. I [just] watched the previous pageant in Maspalomas [via YouTube], so I could learn from him and the others. I also tried to see the other Mr. Gay World pageants from before.”

Magpoc admitted he is pressured to secure a consecutive win for the Philippines in Mr. Gay World. “I would be lying if I say I’m not. There is pressure but it’s a good one because it pushes me to do the very best I can.”

READ:  Nomer Yuzon aims to be first-ever Mr. Gay World from Phl

MEET THE FRONTRUNNERS

Gleeko will be facing a tough competition in becoming the third Mr. Gay World winner crowned by a compatriot. He and 20 other gay ambassadors will be judged in the following activities: sports challenge, photo shoot, written test, personal interview, social responsibility campaign, social media task, online vote, quality and content of video presentation, swimwear, formal wear and national costume.

Here are 12 delegates who will make him compete harder:

  1. Winning Australia’s first Mr. Gay Word title is the best birthday gift that Jordan Paul Bruno could ever receive. He will be turning 26 come finals night. The economics and finance alumnus at the Curtin University in Perth is a celebrity chef and he wants to grow his LGBTI cooking school and release a range of cookbooks, with all proceeds going to LGBTI charities.
  2. Jaimie Deblieck of Belgium, at 19 years old, is the youngest participant. A high school student blessed with an angelic face, he survived an anti-gay assault while going home from a night out in his hometown of Roeselare last February. He considers his young age an advantage in the competition, as he can reach out to teenagers. He’s collaborated with government agencies in coming up with a pro-diversity charter, signed and supported by some of the biggest companies and brands in his country.
  3. Chile’s René Alfredo Rivera Lizana, 30, pursued his bachelor’s degree in physical education at the University of the Sea. A staunch advocate of homo-parental adoption, he dreams of becoming a good father in the future. He believes that “having gay parents is better than having no parents at all—that a child’s greatest need is not necessarily to have two parents, but to be cared for in a godly, nurturing way and to have godly role models.”
  4. Miguel Ángel Rodríguez Castro of Costa Rica is a 30-year-old administrative officer for a private company. He obtained his diploma in business administration at the National Technical University. His goal of fighting for his community became a reality after earning the right to represent his country in Mr. Gay World, and he aspires to “be a leader of union, progress and equality, where there is a place for everybody.”
  5. India’s Samarpan Maiti, 30, works as a senior research fellow in the field of cancer drug discovery from a reputable institute in Kolkata. He is currently completing his PhD in biochemistry. He wants to help the underprivileged members of the LGBT community who are lagging behind, as well as the uneducated people who live in slums in urban areas. He is a rare combination of good looks and brains—an icon of social and sexual inclusiveness in a populous nation that is still struggling to legally accept homosexuality.
  6. Erick Jafeth López Pérez of Mexico spearheads a campaign, entitled “We Are The Same,” focused on “struggle for equality and equity of human rights.” At 39, he is the eldest Mr. Gay World candidate. He’s an industrial engineer, entrepreneur and professional model who believes, “There are no reasons and justifications that should prevent us from being who we are.”
  7. Nepal’s Manindra Singh Danuwar, 29, completed his degrees in social work and psychology at the Triton International College in Kathmandu. He works as a field supervisor and management information system officer for Blue Diamond Society. He helps the organization in coming up with activities that strengthen communities such as promoting good sexual health, psycho-social counseling, raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, documenting human rights violations, etc., among cultural minorities.
  8. Ricky Devine White is a 36-year-old certified life coach, registered personal trainer and group fitness instructor. If he becomes New Zealand’s third Mr. Gay World winner, he would take his tenure to a new direction by encouraging the LGBT international community to live a healthier lifestyle, get into sports and other regular physical activities that are good for the mind, body and spirit.
  9. Portugal’s first envoy to Mr. Gay World is João Pedro Carvalho Goncalves de Oliveira. He is a 38-year-old reporter and editor for Enlacegay, an LGBT media company based in Madrid. He obtained his diploma in languages and Portuguese literature at the Escola Secundária José Afonso Loures. He is also the presenter of “Star Chef Gay,” a TV and Internet program that revolutionizes cooking contests.
  10. Being first runner-up isn’t bad at all. Take the case of Karabo Morake, who placed second to Juan Pinnick in the Mr. Gay World Southern Africa contest last September. Fast forward to April, the latter was forced to withdraw because he underwent a knee operation and was deemed unfit to participate in the rigorous challenges that have been lined up for the candidates. Morake, 27, completed his practical legal training at the University of Cape Town and works as an international relations legal executive manager for a law firm.
  11. Ricardo Tacoronto Castro, 28, might give Spain its second harvest of a Mr. Gay World crown. Deemed as the “most handsome homosexual” in his country at the moment, he owes his sculpted physique to his work as a soldier in Cartagena. This Navy corporal confessed that his co-workers were the first ones to know he was gay before his family, and that “the army is much more open than people think.” He would like to win in order to “continue fighting for rights and achieve the normalization of homosexuality.”
  12. Pakkarapong Khuaikoen of Thailand, 22, is a junior art communications major at the Nation University. “Toy,” his nickname, enjoys being in front of the camera. He is a budding actor, runway model and an advocate for bullying prevention policies in academic institutions. He encourages school administrators to facilitate discussions or after-school activities about gay prejudice.
READ:  Taiwan holds 13th Pride celebration; Filipinos join to highlight local issues

Completing Mr. Gay World 2018’s roster are Canada’s Philippe Laurin, Lukáš Grečko of Czech and Slovak Republic, Finland’s Rami Joel Kiiskinen, Enrique Doleschy of Germany, Japan’s Shogo Kemmoku, Mduduzi Dlamini of Swaziland, Taiwan’s Po-Hung Chen, and Kyle Haggerty of the United States.

Gleeko Magpoc’s haters and critics still have enough time to convert their protests into online votes so he can possibly make the cut, by registering at http://www.mrgayworld.com/register-2/ and voting once every 24 hours until 6 p.m. of May 26 (Manila time).

It takes a lot of courage on his part to endure the pain of cyber bullying. He can hide the tears of sorrow in his eyes, but not in his heart. We just don’t know how many times he’s cried before sleeping at night whenever he reminisces how his countrymen humiliate him online, as the global search draws near. It may really sound cliché, but Magpoc’s bashers will never feel any better if the only thing they know is make him suffer. He doesn’t deserve to feel worthless at this point.

The 10th Mr. Gay World pageant will take place at the Villa Castolini Hotel in Knysna, South Africa, and will be streamed live through the organization’s official Facebook page and YouTube channel on May 27, 12 a.m. (Manila time).

Giovanni Paolo J. Yazon is just your average journalist who can't live without a huge plate of cheesy spaghetti, three cups of brewed coffee, and high-speed Internet every single day. A graduate of mass communication at the Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila, he chased loads of actors, beauty queens, pop artists and even college basketball players until the wee hours of the morning to write their stories eight years. Ivan (how those close to him call him) presently works as a full-time search engine optimization copywriter and an image consultant. He splurges his take-home pay in motivational books and spends his free time touring different heritage towns in the country.

#KaraniwangLGBT

Paolo, naked

Paolo Dumlao, a pansexual Filipino performance artist, uses his naked body as a canvas, believing that art can help the people – both the artist and those who see the artworks. “It makes people think, ask… and feel,” he said, all relevant because “we’re not robots; we’re humans.”

Published

on

Four years ago, Paolo Dumlao, a pansexual Filipino, did his first performance art “as mema lang (out of whim),” he said. At that time, he just wanted to “tick off something from my bucket list.” But he fell in love with the form, and so stayed with it.

Here’s the thing: In his performances, Paolo is always without clothes since he is a nude artist.

There is reason behind this, he said. “It’s not because it’s something different, or because it’s something new since it’s been done before… but because for me, the feeling (when one is nude) is very vulnerable, and I think it’s my most vulnerable form, and I want to be in that state when I perform so I can emphasize with people.”

To be clear, Paolo is not a performing artist; instead, he is a performance artist.

Performance art is different from performing arts. With the latter, “you are portraying a character that is not you. So you’re using your body as a canvas to create another character. When it comes to performance art, you yourself are the character, and the message you relay is different outside of the text,” he said. “At least that’s what I am doing.”

Paolo noted that there are people who see performances of nude artists as sexual, and he said that this is not necessarily true.

On the one hand, just because one is naked doesn’t mean the piece is sexual, as “it could be pure, it could be wholesome (even if the performer is not clothed). And I am able to show these (through my performances), and that (things aren’t) just black and white.”

READ:  Ikaw ay isang bahaghari

And so, it is worth stressing, “it is not pornography; I am not selling my body, I am just using my body as canvas for my art.”

Paolo said that malice needs to be removed when viewing particularly his performances – i.e. “We don’t give malice when seeing a naked child, so why give malice when seeing a naked adult?” This is particularly true when “they’re not doing anything malicious or anything sexual.”

On the other hand, Paolo said with emphasis, even if the piece is also sexual, it’s not like there’s something wrong with that. “We’re all different; sensuality is different for everyone, just as sexuality is different for everyone. You can be modest and that empowers you, and that’s fine. You could be very, very promiscuous and very sexual, and that empowers you, and that’s fine, too. As long as you’re responsible with yourself, you’re responsible when dealing with other people, and you know for a fact you’re not stepping on other people’s toes.”

Though Paolo has been inspired by various artists, his main inspiration are the people he deals with while performing. “My interaction creates an experience for me, and from that experience, I get inspired to make more art,” he said.

Paolo said he gets two reactions when he performs. For one, there are people who get “the vulnerability,” he said. And, secondly, “there are times when (people) get intimidated.” But with performance art, “your art is effective when you get a reaction, once it creates discourse.” And so for Paolo, the piece still works “even if only one person gets it.”

READ:  Nomer Yuzon aims to be first-ever Mr. Gay World from Phl

There are members of his family who disapprove of what he does, though Paolo said this is largely due to security/safety issues – e.g. he could get harassed, or he could be accused of harassing and could get in trouble for this. But Paolo said that he is actually cautious when planning performances, making sure that – yes – he does so in a safe space where he won’t be harassed, and only in contexts where he won’t knowingly end up harassing people.

For those who oversimplify what he’s doing as “just getting naked”, Paolo said performing is actually very draining, not just mentally but also physically. Which is why “I look after my body,” he said, “because I use my body as my canvas and I need to take care of it. I always make sure I am ready for it; it’s strenuous.”

If there’s one lesson his performances taught him, it’s that “we share similar stories,” Paolo said. “We share similar pain, we share similar happiness or success… The levels may be different on how we deal with these, but they’re similar.”

And after his performances, if there is one thing he wants those who see him to take away from seeing him, it’s the ability to “ask questions,” Paolo said. “Never be afraid to ask questions. It’s a start of being curious, of interacting with other people. So if possible, ask all the questions you can ask. It’s a way to grow as a person.”

READ:  Revisiting the ‘alternative family with a cause’, Cavite Smart Guys Global

Continue Reading

People You Should Know

Emma Watson highlights LGBTQI support, wears ‘trans rights are human rights’ t-shirt

The 28-year-old ‘Harry Potter’ actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

Published

on

Emma Watson highlighted her support for the LGBTQI community via a new social media post.

The 28-year-old Harry Potter actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

The move may be deemed small, but – at least in raising the issue – this ought to count, considering Watson has 48 million followers in Instagram alone. As of press time, it already had over a million likes.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

💖✊🏻 @stonewalluk @mermaidsgender @genderedintelligence

A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson) on

Watson’s message appears to be in response to the UK government’s discussion of the Gender Recognition Act (GRA). Trans activists are calling for the GRA to be reformed for it to recognize non-binary identities and makes it easier to legally self-determine gender for trans people of all ages, including an end to requiring that trans statuses be dependent upon medical diagnosis or approval.

This is not the first time Watson showed her support for the LGBTQI community.

In the past, she also wrote about LGBT History Month on Instagram: “It’s 🏳️‍🌈 LGBT History Month in the USA. I have learned so much about feminism and anti-racism through the work of LGBTQIA+ activists. Thank you Sylvia Rivera, Audre Lorde and Marsha P. Johnson!! Sending love to all those I love and wider LGBTQIA+ communities around the world.”

Watson also spearheaded the HeForShe campaign for feminism. Speaking at the UN in 2014, she said: “If we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by what we are — we can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom.”

READ:  Portugal's parliament approves new legal gender change law, bans surgery on intersex infants

Continue Reading

#KaraniwangLGBT

To live a life in service

Meet Carla Culaste, the trans houseparent of a halfway house for people living with HIV in the City of Manila. It’s a challenging – and yet fulfilling – job, he said, as he stressed to others to learn more about HIV to promote non-discrimination.

Published

on

This is part of #KaraniwangLGBT, which Outrage Magazine officially launched on July 26, 2015 to offer vignettes of LGBT people/living, particularly in the Philippines, to give so-called “everyday people” – in this case, the common LGBT people – that chance to share their stories.
As Outrage Magazine editor Michael David C. Tan says: “All our stories are valid – not just the stories of the ‘big shots’. And it’s high time we start telling all our stories.”

Carla Culaste, now 26, was around 12 years old when he first visited the Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI). His sister worked for the non-government organization that was founded by his gay uncle, Joshua Formentera. Even then, he said that he was always “impressed” with how it was able to touch the lives of Filipino PLHIVs, providing them a “safe space” when even their own homes failed to do so.

Little did he know that – by the time he’d turn 22 – he’d be working as the houseparent of the NGO’s Abot Kamay Center, a halfway house for PLHIVs who are in need of a helping hand to get back on their feet.

DAILY ROUTINE

From Monday to Friday, Carla sleeps at the center. On weekends, he heads home (in Parañaque, where his family lives). But even if his work is actually supposedly only from 8:00AM to 5:00PM, “as a houseparent, 27/7 ka nakabantay (I watch after them 24/7).”

Part of Carla’s job is to “always check on the clients” – from checking if they have supplies of their medicines, if they actually take their medicines on time, if they eat properly, et cetera. This is particularly true when dealing with new clients who may still have physical limitations and need help in their day-to-day living in the shelter.

READ:  Portugal's parliament approves new legal gender change law, bans surgery on intersex infants

Aside from this, Carla also helps manage clients who may need to be rushed to the hospital, particularly when “wala silang pamilya na willing tumulong sa kanila (if they don’t have family willing to help them).” By extension, therefore, Carla becomes an alternative family member.

Iniisip ko kasi, bilang houseparent, hindi lang ako nanay o tatay sa kanila (As a houseparent, I do not only see myself as a father or a mother to them), Carla said. “Ano rin ako sa kanila… kapatid, kaibigan na puwede nilang takbuhan pag kailangan nila ng makakausap (I am also a sibling, a friend to them; someone they can go to if they need to talk to someone).”

But it is a fulfilling job, particularly when he sees people he helped do well in life. “Nakakasaya rin (It makes one happy),” he said.

GROWING UP TRANS

Carla didn’t finish high school; though if given a chance, he’d like to study again.

As a trans man, his life was not always easy.

The youngest of six kids, he always identified as a trans man.

“Before, hindi nila ako matanggap (In the past, my family couldn’t accept me),” he said. “Against sa religion nila (Being LGBTQIA was against their religion).”

As a child, two of his borther also bullied him; they hurt him verbally, as well as physically.

When he told his parents about it, they just dismissed the bullying, telling Carla that perhaps “naglalambing lang sila (they were just being affectionate)”.

READ:  Ikaw ay isang bahaghari

But Carla said he still chose to be what he is because this is what makes him happy.

By the time Carla had his first partner, “wala na rin sila nagawa (there was nothing they could do but accept me).”

In hindsight, that experience taught Carla an important lesson in life: To be accepting.

Kung paano mo i-treat ang tao… ipakita mo sa kanila na kaya mo silang intindihin kahit magkaiba kayo (In treating people, show them that you can understand them even if you’re different from each other),” Carla said.

EVERYONE’S ISSUE

With her exposure to the HIV community, Carla wants PLHIVs to learn to care for themselves. For instance, not to do things (e.g.vices) that will – in the end – just be bad on/for them. “Huwag matigas ang ulo (Don’t be hardheaded),” he said.

To everyone, he said “huwag kayong matakot sa PLHIVs (don’t be afraid of PLHIVs).” In fact, “matuto tayong sumuporta (sa PLHIVs) hindi lang sa kamag-anak natin (na may HIV). Maging concern din tayo sa iba. Iwasan natin ang discrimination (We should learn to support PLHIVs, not just relatives who may have it. We should show our concern to everyone. We should avoid discrimination).”

Learning also helps, he said, “at bigyan natin ng kaalaman sarili natin tungkol sa HIV kasi dagdag impormasyon yan para sa atin (and for us to add to our knowledge everything about HIV since this is good to our lifelong learning).”

READ:  Revisiting the ‘alternative family with a cause’, Cavite Smart Guys Global

For more information on Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI), visit Abot Kamay Center at 2613 Dian St., Malate, City of Manila, 1004 Philippines.
They may also be reached at (+632) 4042911; or email pafpiorg@gmail.com.

Continue Reading

NEWSMAKERS

Heart Evangelista pushes for non-discrimination of LGBTQI people

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

Published

on

#LoveIsAllWeNeed

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

In an Instagram post, Evangelista said that “everyone has the right to live, work and dream”, and that “the SOGIE (Equality Bill) is a step in the right direction to guarantee the protection of those rights, especially for our friends in the LGBTQIA+ community.”

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

Evangelista added that “last year the bill made great progress but we still have a long way to go.” This is why “my husband and I are in full support of this bill and hope to see it move forward and become a law.”

Escudero himself has been vocal about his support for the LGBTQI community.

READ:  ‘Ang usaping manggagawa ay usaping LGBT’ – Claire

In 2012, he took part in the “I dare to care about equality”, a photographic campaign spearheaded by the Bahaghari Center for SOGIE Research, Education and Advocacy (Bahaghari Center). Then while running for the VP post last election, he expressed his support for civil union for same-sex couples.

Evangelista’s IG post has already been liked over 80,000 times.

Sen. Chiz Escudero stresses ‘our duty to ensure equality’

Continue Reading

NEWSMAKERS

Karen Davila expresses support for anti-discrimination bill

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

Published

on

#LoveIsAllWeNeed

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

In a Twitter post that – as of press time – has been shared over 160 times, Davila said that the bill “seeks to protect individuals against sex and gender-based discrimination, which include denial of access to public and health services, employment and education.”

Davila then posted a photo of herself wearing a rainbow pin on her collar.


Davila is actually a vocal LGBTQI advocate.

Earlier, in 2016, Davila received the Bahaghari Media Awards from Outrage Magazine for helping inform/educate the public about LGBTQIA-related issues, thereby aiding in bettering the plight of LGBTQIA people particularly in the Philippines.

Bahaghari Media Awards 2016 celebrates LGBTQIA allies in media

Continue Reading

People You Should Know

Jason Mraz opens up about his ‘two spirit’ sexuality, admits having experiences with men

‘I’m Yours’ singer Jason Mraz opened up about his sexuality by saying that he had experiences with men, even while he was dating the woman who became his wife. His wife “laid it out” for him, Mraz said, by calling it ‘Two Spirit’. “I really like that.”

Published

on

Screencap of Jason Mraz from the YouTube video of 'I'm Yours'

“I’m Yours” singer Jason Mraz, 41, opened up about his sexuality by revealing that “I’ve had experiences with men, even while I was dating the woman who became my wife.”

Interviewed by Billboard, Mraz said that “it was like, ‘Wow, does that mean I am gay?’”

His wife for three years now, Christina Carano, helped him embrace his sexual identity.

“My wife laid it out for me. She calls it ‘Two Spirit,’ which is what the Native Americans call someone who can love both man and woman,” Mraz said. “I really like that.”

The term “Two Spirit” was coined in the 1990s at a conference for gay and lesbian Native Americans as an umbrella term with no specific description of gender or sexual orientation, according to the New York Times.

Mraz has actually opened up about his sexuality even prior to this. In 2005, for instance, he told Genre that he was “bisexually open-minded” when he told the publication that “I have never been in a sexual relationship with a man. If the right one came along, then sure.”

In 2012, he also indicated that he wasn’t comfortable with labels. “Were we to live in a society that was equal those labels wouldn’t really exist or matter except maybe at the DMV or someplace where, for some reason, you have to put down gender, race or age,” he said to Pride Source. “I don’t get it. I don’t get why sexuality has to be such a big deal.”

READ:  Taiwan holds 13th Pride celebration; Filipinos join to highlight local issues

Just this June, in time for the observance of Pride, Mraz wrote a Pride-themed poem, where a line stated: “I am bi your side”. Mraz said that he “didn’t realize (it) was going to be so telling”.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Most Popular