Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

NEWSMAKERS

30% of LGBTI Filipinos report workplace discrimination because of their SOGIE

Thirty percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people in the Philippines reported being harassed, bullied or discriminated against by others while at work because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and sex characteristics.

IMAGE BY JON TYSON FROM UNSPLASH.COM

Still a hard LGBTQIA life.

Thirty percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people in the Philippines reported being harassed, bullied or discriminated against by others while at work because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC).

Respondents in the study reported a range of negative experiences in the workplace, including people making jokes or slurs about LGBTI persons, gossiping or sharing rumors, or making critical comments about how they dress, behave or speak. IMAGE BY JON TYSON FROM UNSPLASH.COM

This is according to a United Nations (UN) study that looked at the levels of SOGIESC-related discrimination encountered by LGBTI people in three countries: China, Thailand and the Philippines. It is in the Philippines where the rates are highest, compared to 21% in China, and 23 percent in Thailand.

The study – undertaken jointly by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the International Labour Office (ILO) – involved a desk review as well as collection of quantitative data from 1,571 respondents and qualitative data from in-country focus group discussions with 151 participants. The report, entitled LGBTI People and Employment: Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression, and Sex Characteristics in China, the Philippines and Thailand,  made concrete recommendations for governments, the private sector, civil society, multilateral agencies and non-government organizations to take action to improve the situation for LGBTI people in employment settings.

Achieving decent work for all is one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and an important component of the post-2015 development agenda, which has at its core the principle of equality and non-discrimination.

“Access to decent work forms an essential part of LGBTI people’s lives and is deeply intertwined with their socio-economic empowerment and ability to participate in the public sphere,” said Jaco Cilliers, chief policy and program support at UNDP Bangkok Regional Hub. “Discrimination towards LGBTI people in the workplace also represents a fundamental challenge to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’s commitment to ‘leave no one behind’.”

Respondents in the study reported a range of negative experiences in the workplace, including people making jokes or slurs about LGBTI persons, gossiping or sharing rumors, or making critical comments about how they dress, behave or speak.

Some 10 percent of respondents in China, 21 percent in the Philippines and 28 percent in Thailand believed that they were denied a job due to their SOGIESC. In all three countries, more than two-thirds said they had seen a job advertisement that explicitly excludes their SOGIE in the job requirement.

“Employers should recognize that being LGBTI-inclusive is not only a good practice, but also makes great business sense, and can establish a competitive advantage over other companies that are not inclusive,” said Kofi Amekudzi, senior technical specialist at ILO. “LGBTI inclusion in the workplace means respecting the rights of LGBTI people to work, and to work with dignity and with their human rights valued.”

The evidence shows that the few workplaces that have LGBTI-inclusive policies have seen positive impacts. As such it’s important to learn about workforce diversity statistics before applying for a job.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

The higher number of protective policies correlates with less experience of workplace discrimination and higher levels of reported job satisfaction among LGBTI people. A more open and affirming workplace is likely to encourage satisfaction and greater loyalty among LGBTI employees, and lead to greater productivity and improve the corporate image.

Thirty percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people in the Philippines reported being harassed, bullied or discriminated against by others while at work because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and sex characteristics (SOGIESC). IMAGE BY BETHANY LEGG FROM UNSPLASH.COM

“Creating better workplaces for LGBTI employees will benefit the national economy, individual companies, organizations and departments, and the economic life and social well-being of LGBTI people and their families,” said Prof. Suen Yiu-tung, director of the Sexualities Research Programme at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and one of the authors of the study.

The report also highlighted that there were limited legal protections from discrimination in the workplace, and there were also few options for recourse through internal workplace policies.

In the Philippines, only 20% stated that their employers have an official complaint procedure in place for LGBTI discrimination cases. The number is lower in China (5%) and Thailand (17%).

The Philippines also has no national law that provides protection against discrimination based on gender expression. In the country, some limited legal protection for LGBT people exists at the local level. Local ordinances, along with other grounds, protecting people against discrimination based on SOGIE only exist in 5 provinces, 15 cities, 1 municipality and 3 barangays (villages).

At least Thailand already has a national law, the Gender Equality Act B.E. 2558 (2015), pertaining this. Meanwhile, China’s national labor law currently does not specifically provide protections to LGBTI people against discrimination in the workplace.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Like Us On Facebook

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

#KaraniwangLGBT

Meet Sophia Ordinan, a #transgender woman who - at 13 - had a heart transplant after she was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot. Now...

Features

The Bangsamoro Parliament took up two resolutions that tackle SOGIESC-related discrimination in these parts of the Philippines, following increasing - and widely covered -...

Health & Wellness

When comparing autistic females and males directly, autistic females were more likely to be sexually active; more likely to identify as asexual, bisexual, and...

NEWSMAKERS

The bombing that happened in Datu Piang, Maguindanao on Saturday (September 18) may have been motivated by hate against LGBTQIA people there.

Advertisement