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Mameta Endo: Confronting wrongdoings against LGBTs

In 2005, when Mameta Endo was 17, he became an activist after encountering difficulties as a transman in Japan. Aside from helming IDAHOT in Japan, he is now one of the country’s LGBT leaders who push for education reforms to include LGBT issues. “I want people to know that LGBT problems, or problems related to sexual orientation, are topics related to human rights. And that’s why all kids have to be taught about this at schools. I think everyone has to know this,” he says.

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Recognizing that LGBTQIA people in the Philippines affect, or are affected by LGBTQIA-related developments in other parts of the world, Outrage Magazine is featuring the LGBTQIA activists who try to effect changes to better the lives of LGBTQIA people in their countries.

In high school, Mameta Endo recalled being forced to wear women’s school uniform. “As a transman, it was painful (for me) to wear girl’s clothing,” he recalled. “It was so terrible that I suffered from stomach ulcers and had thoughts of suicide.”

Mameta tried talking to those in positions of power, “but our teachers didn’t understand me. I told a teacher who was teaching sex education about my situation, but she simply said it might be just a phase and that I was probably too impacted by comics or TV shows.”

“We have many issues in our LGBT community, such as high rates of suicide and mental health problems, poverty among lesbians and trans people, bullying in schools and workplaces, rising rates of HIV infections, and so on,” Mameta Endo says. “But I think most of these problems are related to our educational system. Our curriculum doesn't include content on LGBT or sexual/gender diversity. So, we grow up without knowing who we are, who our friends are. This maintains homophobia within society and many of us LGBT folks have low self-esteem, unhealthy behaviors, and drop out of schools and quit jobs.”

“We have many issues in our LGBT community, such as high rates of suicide and mental health problems, poverty among lesbians and trans people, bullying in schools and workplaces, rising rates of HIV infections, and so on,” Mameta Endo says. “But I think most of these problems are related to our educational system. Our curriculum doesn’t include content on LGBT or sexual/gender diversity. So, we grow up without knowing who we are, who our friends are. This maintains homophobia within society and many of us LGBT folks have low self-esteem, unhealthy behaviors, and drop out of schools and quit jobs.”

At home, it wasn’t any easier either. “My mother also didn’t believe me and denied my gender expression,” Mameta said.

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And so he had to keep wearing skirts everyday. “It was so harsh that I felt like I was not worth anything at all,” Mameta said.

Fortunately for Mameta, “most of my friends accepted me for who I am. They empowered me. They were angry about how adults treated me, and they kept telling me I was not wrong.”

That was in 2005, when Mameta was 17.

“All of these made me an activist. I believed that I must change these wrongdoings against LGBT students, and that I must (do something to) end such (acts) in my generation.”

Mameta started the movement in Japan for the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHOT, held every 17 of May). He now serves as the director of IDAHOT-net Japan (since 2007).

“I’m really happy that I finally got attention from society about how important to know how to treat LGBT people at schools,” he said. “It’s been 10 years since I started to take action, and now education-related problems related to the LGBT community is taken up more squarely by the media.”

Mameta is specially proud that “the grassroots actions of activists, including myesle, made this happen. Now, even our country’s measures to prevent suicide specifically say how important it is to support LGBT youth.”

Mameta believes there is more for the LGBT community to do.

“We have many issues in our LGBT community, such as high rates of suicide and mental health problems, poverty among lesbians and trans people, bullying in schools and workplaces, rising rates of HIV infections, and so on,” Mameta said. “But I think most of these problems are related to our educational system. Our curriculum doesn’t include content on LGBT or sexual/gender diversity. So, we grow up without knowing who we are, who our friends are. This maintains homophobia within society and many of us LGBT folks have low self-esteem, unhealthy behaviors, and drop out of schools and quit jobs.”

READ:  Senatorial candidate Migs Zubiri supports penalizing LGBT discrimination, but is against marriage equality

Particularly in Japan, “bullying and suicide among young people is a very serious problem. Most teachers, parents and lawmakers want to decrease bullying and suicide among teens. So the LGBT community needs to speak out and tell them about who we really are, and what is going on among LGBT teens. I think we can help each other to make it better,” Mameta said.

Mameta is critical of how “sometimes, people within the LGBT community are not so interested in our differences. Some rich gay men don’t pay attention to the issues of lesbians who are not as rich as them, or about what transgender people are saying. People who live in big cities don’t care about people in conservative or rural areas. We should be more inclusive and we need to raise awareness for our differences within the community.”

Mameta, nonetheless, recognizes that “people who have new ideas are now getting involved into LGBT communities, and it inspires me a lot. For example, the idea of having allies was really rare in Japan five years ago. But now, younger people who are not LGBT started to think about LGBT people, and how we all can work out LGBT-related problems together.”

At the end of the day, “I want people to know that LGBT problems, or problems related to sexual orientation, are topics related to human rights. And that’s why all kids have to be taught about this at schools. I think everyone has to know this,” Mameta ended.

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"If someone asked you about me, about what I do for a living, it's to 'weave words'," says Kiki Tan, who has been a writer "for as long as I care to remember." With this, this one writes about... anything and everything.

People You Should Know

Emma Watson highlights LGBTQI support, wears ‘trans rights are human rights’ t-shirt

The 28-year-old ‘Harry Potter’ actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

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Emma Watson highlighted her support for the LGBTQI community via a new social media post.

The 28-year-old Harry Potter actress showed her support for the rights of all transgender people by wearing a t-shirt that stated: “Trans rights are human rights.”

The move may be deemed small, but – at least in raising the issue – this ought to count, considering Watson has 48 million followers in Instagram alone. As of press time, it already had over a million likes.

 

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💖✊🏻 @stonewalluk @mermaidsgender @genderedintelligence

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Watson’s message appears to be in response to the UK government’s discussion of the Gender Recognition Act (GRA). Trans activists are calling for the GRA to be reformed for it to recognize non-binary identities and makes it easier to legally self-determine gender for trans people of all ages, including an end to requiring that trans statuses be dependent upon medical diagnosis or approval.

This is not the first time Watson showed her support for the LGBTQI community.

In the past, she also wrote about LGBT History Month on Instagram: “It’s 🏳️‍🌈 LGBT History Month in the USA. I have learned so much about feminism and anti-racism through the work of LGBTQIA+ activists. Thank you Sylvia Rivera, Audre Lorde and Marsha P. Johnson!! Sending love to all those I love and wider LGBTQIA+ communities around the world.”

Watson also spearheaded the HeForShe campaign for feminism. Speaking at the UN in 2014, she said: “If we stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by what we are — we can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom.”

READ:  'Advocates kami kasi psychologists tayo' - Filipino psychologists

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To live a life in service

Meet Carla Culaste, the trans houseparent of a halfway house for people living with HIV in the City of Manila. It’s a challenging – and yet fulfilling – job, he said, as he stressed to others to learn more about HIV to promote non-discrimination.

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This is part of #KaraniwangLGBT, which Outrage Magazine officially launched on July 26, 2015 to offer vignettes of LGBT people/living, particularly in the Philippines, to give so-called “everyday people” – in this case, the common LGBT people – that chance to share their stories.
As Outrage Magazine editor Michael David C. Tan says: “All our stories are valid – not just the stories of the ‘big shots’. And it’s high time we start telling all our stories.”

Carla Culaste, now 26, was around 12 years old when he first visited the Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI). His sister worked for the non-government organization that was founded by his gay uncle, Joshua Formentera. Even then, he said that he was always “impressed” with how it was able to touch the lives of Filipino PLHIVs, providing them a “safe space” when even their own homes failed to do so.

Little did he know that – by the time he’d turn 22 – he’d be working as the houseparent of the NGO’s Abot Kamay Center, a halfway house for PLHIVs who are in need of a helping hand to get back on their feet.

DAILY ROUTINE

From Monday to Friday, Carla sleeps at the center. On weekends, he heads home (in Parañaque, where his family lives). But even if his work is actually supposedly only from 8:00AM to 5:00PM, “as a houseparent, 27/7 ka nakabantay (I watch after them 24/7).”

Part of Carla’s job is to “always check on the clients” – from checking if they have supplies of their medicines, if they actually take their medicines on time, if they eat properly, et cetera. This is particularly true when dealing with new clients who may still have physical limitations and need help in their day-to-day living in the shelter.

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Aside from this, Carla also helps manage clients who may need to be rushed to the hospital, particularly when “wala silang pamilya na willing tumulong sa kanila (if they don’t have family willing to help them).” By extension, therefore, Carla becomes an alternative family member.

Iniisip ko kasi, bilang houseparent, hindi lang ako nanay o tatay sa kanila (As a houseparent, I do not only see myself as a father or a mother to them), Carla said. “Ano rin ako sa kanila… kapatid, kaibigan na puwede nilang takbuhan pag kailangan nila ng makakausap (I am also a sibling, a friend to them; someone they can go to if they need to talk to someone).”

But it is a fulfilling job, particularly when he sees people he helped do well in life. “Nakakasaya rin (It makes one happy),” he said.

GROWING UP TRANS

Carla didn’t finish high school; though if given a chance, he’d like to study again.

As a trans man, his life was not always easy.

The youngest of six kids, he always identified as a trans man.

“Before, hindi nila ako matanggap (In the past, my family couldn’t accept me),” he said. “Against sa religion nila (Being LGBTQIA was against their religion).”

As a child, two of his borther also bullied him; they hurt him verbally, as well as physically.

When he told his parents about it, they just dismissed the bullying, telling Carla that perhaps “naglalambing lang sila (they were just being affectionate)”.

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But Carla said he still chose to be what he is because this is what makes him happy.

By the time Carla had his first partner, “wala na rin sila nagawa (there was nothing they could do but accept me).”

In hindsight, that experience taught Carla an important lesson in life: To be accepting.

Kung paano mo i-treat ang tao… ipakita mo sa kanila na kaya mo silang intindihin kahit magkaiba kayo (In treating people, show them that you can understand them even if you’re different from each other),” Carla said.

EVERYONE’S ISSUE

With her exposure to the HIV community, Carla wants PLHIVs to learn to care for themselves. For instance, not to do things (e.g.vices) that will – in the end – just be bad on/for them. “Huwag matigas ang ulo (Don’t be hardheaded),” he said.

To everyone, he said “huwag kayong matakot sa PLHIVs (don’t be afraid of PLHIVs).” In fact, “matuto tayong sumuporta (sa PLHIVs) hindi lang sa kamag-anak natin (na may HIV). Maging concern din tayo sa iba. Iwasan natin ang discrimination (We should learn to support PLHIVs, not just relatives who may have it. We should show our concern to everyone. We should avoid discrimination).”

Learning also helps, he said, “at bigyan natin ng kaalaman sarili natin tungkol sa HIV kasi dagdag impormasyon yan para sa atin (and for us to add to our knowledge everything about HIV since this is good to our lifelong learning).”

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For more information on Positive Action Foundation Philippines Inc. (PAFPI), visit Abot Kamay Center at 2613 Dian St., Malate, City of Manila, 1004 Philippines.
They may also be reached at (+632) 4042911; or email pafpiorg@gmail.com.

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NEWSMAKERS

Heart Evangelista pushes for non-discrimination of LGBTQI people

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

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#LoveIsAllWeNeed

Actress Heart Evangelista – wife of Sen. Francis Escudero – expressed her support for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

In an Instagram post, Evangelista said that “everyone has the right to live, work and dream”, and that “the SOGIE (Equality Bill) is a step in the right direction to guarantee the protection of those rights, especially for our friends in the LGBTQIA+ community.”

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

Evangelista added that “last year the bill made great progress but we still have a long way to go.” This is why “my husband and I are in full support of this bill and hope to see it move forward and become a law.”

Escudero himself has been vocal about his support for the LGBTQI community.

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In 2012, he took part in the “I dare to care about equality”, a photographic campaign spearheaded by the Bahaghari Center for SOGIE Research, Education and Advocacy (Bahaghari Center). Then while running for the VP post last election, he expressed his support for civil union for same-sex couples.

Evangelista’s IG post has already been liked over 80,000 times.

Sen. Chiz Escudero stresses ‘our duty to ensure equality’

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NEWSMAKERS

Karen Davila expresses support for anti-discrimination bill

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

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#LoveIsAllWeNeed

TV personality Karen Davila expressed her support for the LGBTQI community in the Philippines by highlighting the relevance of the need for the SOGIE (sexual orientation, gender identity and expression) Equality Bill, the newest version of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB).

The SOGIE Equality Bill passed the Lower House in 2017; but the Senate version of the anti-discrimination bill (ADB) – the Senate Bill No. 1271 – remains stalled.

In a Twitter post that – as of press time – has been shared over 160 times, Davila said that the bill “seeks to protect individuals against sex and gender-based discrimination, which include denial of access to public and health services, employment and education.”

Davila then posted a photo of herself wearing a rainbow pin on her collar.


Davila is actually a vocal LGBTQI advocate.

Earlier, in 2016, Davila received the Bahaghari Media Awards from Outrage Magazine for helping inform/educate the public about LGBTQIA-related issues, thereby aiding in bettering the plight of LGBTQIA people particularly in the Philippines.

Bahaghari Media Awards 2016 celebrates LGBTQIA allies in media

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People You Should Know

Jason Mraz opens up about his ‘two spirit’ sexuality, admits having experiences with men

‘I’m Yours’ singer Jason Mraz opened up about his sexuality by saying that he had experiences with men, even while he was dating the woman who became his wife. His wife “laid it out” for him, Mraz said, by calling it ‘Two Spirit’. “I really like that.”

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Screencap of Jason Mraz from the YouTube video of 'I'm Yours'

“I’m Yours” singer Jason Mraz, 41, opened up about his sexuality by revealing that “I’ve had experiences with men, even while I was dating the woman who became my wife.”

Interviewed by Billboard, Mraz said that “it was like, ‘Wow, does that mean I am gay?’”

His wife for three years now, Christina Carano, helped him embrace his sexual identity.

“My wife laid it out for me. She calls it ‘Two Spirit,’ which is what the Native Americans call someone who can love both man and woman,” Mraz said. “I really like that.”

The term “Two Spirit” was coined in the 1990s at a conference for gay and lesbian Native Americans as an umbrella term with no specific description of gender or sexual orientation, according to the New York Times.

Mraz has actually opened up about his sexuality even prior to this. In 2005, for instance, he told Genre that he was “bisexually open-minded” when he told the publication that “I have never been in a sexual relationship with a man. If the right one came along, then sure.”

In 2012, he also indicated that he wasn’t comfortable with labels. “Were we to live in a society that was equal those labels wouldn’t really exist or matter except maybe at the DMV or someplace where, for some reason, you have to put down gender, race or age,” he said to Pride Source. “I don’t get it. I don’t get why sexuality has to be such a big deal.”

READ:  Teaching a thing or two about LGBT human rights

Just this June, in time for the observance of Pride, Mraz wrote a Pride-themed poem, where a line stated: “I am bi your side”. Mraz said that he “didn’t realize (it) was going to be so telling”.

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The young believer

For Ian Jaurigue, it is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support the LGBTQI community these days. “But as long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” he said.

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“As long as there are LGBT advocates who will fight tirelessly for the advancement of our advocacy, things will get better.”

So said 19-year-old Ian Jaurigue, a self-identified “gender advocate”.

And Ian believes that “(the older generation) did a good job when it comes to working for the advocacy, and we need to learn from their experiences and be grateful for it. If they did not start it, the advocacy would not have had moved forward.”

According to Ian, the young advocates today still have a lot to do; and for Ian, this is “not just talk and rant about (the issues).”

But while recognizing the efforts of those who helped start the movement, Ian also recognizes that there are gaps. And these gaps are not helped by the “disconnect” between his generation and the one before it.

“The struggles may have evolved and revolutionized, but we, the younger generation, still need to reflect and learn from what they have accomplished,” he said. Only “by doing this (will we be helped to) have a stronger grasp of our advocacy.”

Also, even if the LGBTQI movement has reached new heights, according to Ian, the young advocates today still have a lot to do; and for Ian, this is “not just talk and rant about (the issues).”

“It is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support us. But it does not mean that we should settle for these little triumphs. As long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” Ian said.

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Incidentally, Ian is also a freelance makeup artist, theater and indie actor, dancer, a student at U.P. Diliman, and… a drag artist. He is known in the drag community as – plainly – Mrs Tan.

“My style is a mixture of dance, comedy, and theater,” Ian said.

Though he is still new in the world of drag, Ian believes that the way he carries himself and how he performs onstage prove that “age is nothing but a number”.

Ian merges his advocacy with his performances, making sure that “every performance brings a certain message and not just a spectacle. I like the feeling when I’m able to give a deeper message to the audience while I’m performing,” he said.

His first foray into the world of drag was when he joined U.P. Samaskom’s Live AIDS. Ian took on the role of a drag queen. But he felt, during that time, that “drag should be more than what I did in Live AIDS; there should be meaning to it.”

Whenever he performs, “I feel a sense of fulfillment and liberation. I’m not just entertaining people, I’m also giving them something to think about. There is pride to it.”

For someone as young as Ian, “Pride is both a celebration and a revolution.”

On the one hand, it is a celebration of the LGBT community’s diversity, accomplishments, and ongoing contributions. But on the other hand, “Pride is also a protest for the members who are not able to take advantage and enjoy their basic human rights, and for those who have died because they are members of the LGBTQI community,” Ian ended.

“It is nice to know that there are already a lot of people who support us. But it does not mean that we should settle for these little triumphs. As long as there is still inequality on the basis of one’s SOGIE, our call and our fight should be stronger,” Ian said.

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