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Two men linked to LGBT Facebook page arrested in Indonesia

Indonesian police arrested two men who allegedly operated a Facebook account to facilitate meet-ups for gay people and other sex-related services. The case marks the first police crackdown on online LGBT groups in this conservative country.

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Indonesia’s LGBT crackdown continues.

Indonesian police arrested two men who allegedly operated a Facebook account to facilitate meet-ups for gay people and other sex-related services. The two men being now held were allegedly managing a Facebook page named “Gay Bandung Indonesia” since 2015, which has 4,093 members.

According to Hari Brata, the deputy director at the West Java police directorate of special crimes, the suspects (who were identified by their initials IS and IH) were charged with “breaking electronic information law by creating and transmitting pornographic content”.

Specifically, the suspects were charged under Article 27, Point 1 of the Electronic Transactions and Information (ITE) Law on transmitting and spreading electronic information containing immorality. The law carries a maximum sentence of six years’ imprisonment and a maximum fine of one billion rupiah.

The case marks the first police crackdown on online LGBT groups.

Consensual same-sex sexual intercourse is actually legal in Indonesia, except the provinces of Aceh and for Muslims in the city of Palembang in South Sumatra. But the conservative country is known for anti-LGBT attacks, with raids of LGBT-related venues common, as well as public caning of members of the LGBT community.

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Hungary eyes to end legal recognition of trans people

A draft law proposed by the Hungarian government eyes to end legal gender recognition for transgender people. The bill stipulates that gender should be defined as “biological sex based on primary sex characteristics and chromosomes”.

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A draft law proposed by the Hungarian government eyes to end legal gender recognition for transgender people. The bill stipulates that gender should be defined as “biological sex based on primary sex characteristics and chromosomes”. As such, it would record people’s “sex at birth” in the Hungarian civil registry, making it impossible to change anyone’s legally recognized gender.

Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orbán’s government previously introduced a measure that in effect banned universities from teaching gender studies.

Council of Europe’s commissioner for human rights Dunja Mijatović called on Hungary’s parliament not to adopt the law, saying that the measure was in contravention of human rights standards and the case law of the European court of human rights.

“Transgender persons have the right to legal recognition of their gender based on self-determination. This is an essential step to ensure respect for their human rights in all areas of life. Legal gender recognition is a matter of human dignity,” she said in a statement.

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A third of Poland declared ‘LGBT-free zone’

Local municipalities in Poland adopted resolutions that are specifically “against LGBT propaganda” or are “pro-family”, thereby creating hostile spaces for non-heterosexual people or those who are not deemed to be for the so-called “natural family”.

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Hate thrives in parts of Poland, apparently.

Local municipalities in Poland adopted resolutions that are specifically “against LGBT propaganda” or are “pro-family”, thereby creating hostile spaces for non-heterosexual people or those who are not deemed to be for the so-called “natural family”.

According to an “Atlas of Hate” map, a Polish area greater than the size of Hungary has effectively become an “LGBT-free zone” in the heart of Central Europe. Almost 100 municipalities adopted the resolutions (with municipalities starting to pass the first revolutions in March 2019), including five voivodships (the largest administrative unit in Poland) in the southeast of the country, and dozens of counties and other smaller units.

The resolutions are actually non-binding; but these still highlight how a handful of Polish politicians are denouncing of “LGBT ideology” as a “foreign import” that is supposedly threatening the Polish nation and its antiquated Christian values.

One of the resolutions, passed in April 2019 by the local council in Ryki, a town 100 kilometres southeast of Warsaw, states: “In relation to the aggressive homosexual propaganda, promoted and conducted as part of the ideological war by leftist-liberal political circles and ‘LGBT’ groups, which are threatening our fundamental norms and the values of our social and national life, our council adopts the declaration ‘Powiat Rycki free of gender ideology and LGBT.’”

This resolution also states that its purpose is to “defend children, youth, families and Polish schools from sexual depravity and indoctrination, which lead to many pathologies already existing in Western countries, such as accepting pornography, abortion, sexual criminality, the crisis of the family and many others”.

READ:  A Future Together

It similarly decries the “promotion of homosexuality” and sexual education in schools, the “early sexualisation of children” promoted by the World Health Organization, the “pressure exercised by homopropaganda” and the “imposition by LGBT activists of… programmes and an ideology leading to the depravation of children”.

Human rights campaigners – including the European Parliament – have condemned the resolutions, saying they are discriminatory and undermine LGBTQIA rights.

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Colonial-era law criminalizing gay sex retained in Singapore

Gay sex is illegal in Singapore. The ban carries a maximum penalty of two years in jail for homosexual acts.

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Gay sex is illegal in Singapore.

That’s the gist in the decision made by Singapore’s High Court, which ruled that its colonial-era law criminalizing sex between men is constitutional and would be retained, overturning a bid by gay rights activists to scrap it.

Singapore is one of former British colonies still clinging to Section 377A of the Penal Code (the “anti-buggery law”), which came into force in 1938 after being adapted from a 19th-century Indian penal code. Though rarely enforced, that the law exists at all is an affront to equal treatment sought by the LGBTQIA people particularly of Singapore.

In Singapore, the ban carries a maximum penalty of two years in jail for homosexual acts.

The latest attempt to overturn the law was spearheaded by three gay activists who lodged court challenges seeking to prove that the law is unconstitutional. But the High Court dismissed all three after hearing them together behind closed doors. The High Court ruled that the law does not violate articles of Singapore’s constitution regarding equality and freedom of speech.

The High Court similarly stated that just because the legislation was not enforced, it did not “render it redundant,” stating: “Legislation remains important in reflecting public sentiment and beliefs.”

Speaking outside the High Court, M. Ravi, a lawyer for one of the complainants, said that the decision is “shocking to the conscience and it is so arbitrary. It is so discriminatory, this legislation.”

READ:  Empowering barangays to empower LGBTQIA Filipinos

This is not the first time that the law was challenged. In 2014, the first challenge to the law was also dismissed, highlighting that the city-state is still conservative.

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Idaho legislature eyes to ban transgender people from modifying birth certificates

The Idaho legislature is asking the governor to sign into law a bill that will ban transgender people from modifying their birth certificates to reflect their gender identity. There is already a federal court ruling that ban such a law.

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In the US, the Idaho legislature is asking the governor to sign into law a bill that will ban transgender people from modifying their birth certificates to reflect their gender identity. The Senate passed the legislation in a 27-6 vote. The state House previously passed the bill.

There is already a federal court ruling that ban such a law. In March 2018, a federal judge ruled that Idaho’s law barring transgender people from making the birth certificate change violated the Equal Protection Clause of the US Constitution. The same judge scrapped the ban and warned against new rules.

And so if signed into law, the new bill would likely trigger costly lawsuits.

Ohio and Tennessee are the only other states in the US where transgender people cannot change their birth certificates.

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A charterer’s guide to Papua New Guinea

quite surprising that Papua New Guinea still fails to register on the radar of many adventurous travelers given that it has the largest area of intact rainforest outside the Amazon.

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It’s quite surprising that Papua New Guinea still fails to register on the radar of many adventurous travelers given that it has the largest area of intact rainforest outside the Amazon. With more than 600 islands, this huge island country offers visitors a huge range of fascinating things to engage with, whether it be related to food, culture, activities or the stunning environment itself. Plus, with so many islands making up the country, Papua New Guinea represents the perfect place to take a chartering expedition.

In this article we demonstrate some of the things that should be on the top of your list. 

Biodiversity like nowhere else on earth

Taking a luxury yacht charter to Papua New Guinea would be a waste without the opportunity to immerse yourself in its impressive waters. As a country largely untouched by tourism, Papua New Guinea has gained an international reputation as a premiere site for diving due to the plethora of barrier reefs, coral walls, coral atolls, coral gardens and shipwrecks that lie under its clear waters. 

Divers interested in marine biodiversity are also in for a treat – despite only covering 1 percent of the Earth’s surface, Papua New Guinea has 5% of the world’s biodiversity in an area referred to as the Coral Triangle. This amounts to an incredible 800 species of coral, 20,000 plant species, 600 species of fish, and 750 species of birds. 

Even if you’re more interested in snorkeling, you’ll still be able to catch a glimpse of large pelagic fish, sharks, rays and, in September, you might even spot a pod of orcas if you’re particularly lucky! For those wanting to interact with the water in a drier capacity, Papua Guinea offers some incredible fishing. Jungle rivers teem with Black Bass and river tigers, while ocean fishing can net you some impressive dog tooth tuna, sailfish and marlin. 

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Immerse yourself in local culture

The yacht charter to Papua New Guinea is price-friendly, especially if you’re travelling from Australia. Certainly one of the biggest drawcards of Papua New Guinea is the incredible cultural diversity. In a country where over 800 languages spoken, it’s easy to see how unique dances, rituals, festivals, music and art play a huge part in the daily lives of locals. If you’re wanting to immerse yourself in local culture, make sure to organize a “Sing Sing,” a local tribal dance. During this dance, you’ll have the good fortune of the villagers painting you with traditional decorations and demonstrating their unique cultural rites, dance and music. 

Although generally hot and humid all year round, the best time to see all of this is typically during the drier months between May through to October. As an added bonus, these months also happen to be when many of the country’s big festivals are held!

Charter this amazing land today

With an unmatched diversity in flora, fauna and natural scenery, Papua New Guinea is the perfect destination for charterers looking for a travel adventure. Whether you’re a fan of fishing, wreck dives or food, this beautiful country has more than enough to offer and with it only just starting to turn heads internationally, there’s never been a better time to check it out.  

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Bill proposing nationwide ban on ‘conversion therapy’ introduced in Canada

Amendments to the Criminal Code proposing to ban so-called “conversion therapy” practices to change, suppress, or divert one’s sexual orientation or gender identity were introduced in Canada by its ministers of Justice and Diversity, Inclusion and Youth.

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Amendments to the Criminal Code proposing to ban so-called “conversion therapy” practices to change, suppress, or divert one’s sexual orientation or gender identity were introduced in Canada by its ministers of Justice and Diversity, Inclusion and Youth.

“Conversion therapy” practices are already illegal in a number of provinces and cities around Canada, including Ontario, Manitoba, Vancouver, Calgary, and Edmonton. The “Act to amend the Criminal Code (conversion therapy)” goes a step beyond regional bans and proposes nation-wide criminalization of the practices, naming specifically the prohibition of causing minors to undergo “conversion therapy” at home or abroad, as well as criminalizing advertising of and profiting from “conversion therapy”.

David Lametti, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, and the Bardish Chagger, Minister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth, announced the introduction of proposed legislative amendments to the Criminal Code.

The legislation proposes five new Criminal Code offences related to conversion therapy. These include:

  • causing a minor to undergo conversion therapy
  • removing a minor from Canada to undergo conversion therapy abroad
  • causing a person to undergo conversion therapy against their will
  • profiting from providing conversion therapy
  • advertising an offer to provide conversion therapy

The legislation would also authorize courts to order the seizure of conversion therapy advertisements or to order their removal from computer systems or the Internet.

Conversion therapy aims to change an individual’s sexual orientation to heterosexual, to repress or reduce non-heterosexual attraction or sexual behaviors, or to change an individual’s gender identity to match the sex they were assigned at birth. It harms and stigmatizes lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and two-spirit (LGBTQ2) persons, undermines their dignity and negatively impacts their equality rights. It reflects myths and stereotypes about LGBTQ2 persons, in particular that sexual orientations other than heterosexual, and gender identities other than cisgender, can and should be changed. The practice can take various forms, including counselling and behavioural modification.

READ:  Empowering barangays to empower LGBTQIA Filipinos

If passed, Canada will join Malta, Ecuador, Brazil, and Taiwan, becoming only the 5th country in the world to ban “conversion therapy” at a national level.

International attention on so-called “conversion therapy” has grown in recent months and years. The UN’s Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity is working on a report on the topic due to be issued in June. A nationwide ban is pending in Germany; bans have also been considered in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Chile and elsewhere.

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